Nav: Home

The decline of state-level IVC filter utilization

April 04, 2019

After a period of prior growth, national inferior vena cava (IVC) filter utilization in the Medicare population has markedly declined over the last decade according to a prior Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute study published in 2018. How IVC filter utilization has varied at the state level as well as across different payer populations during the recent decline in utilization is unknown. This new study, published online in the American Journal of Roentgenology, assesses state level IVC filter utilization and expands the population set to include both the Medicare and the privately insured population.

Using large individual beneficiary claims-level Medicare research identifiable files and a proprietary U.S. research database of the commercially insured population, Kishore and colleagues identified all billed IVC filter placement procedures performed between 2009 and 2015. They compared the population-adjusted utilization rates by state and payer type.

"Nationally, utilization in Medicare population was 5.0 times higher than that in the private insurance utilization," said first author Divya Kishore, fourth year medical student at Emory University. "Despite the national decline, utilization in Medicare and private insurance population increased in five and seven states, respectively."

Between 2009 and 2015, IVC filter utilization across the United States declined by 36.3% in the Medicare population and by 26.6% in the privately insured population. For the Medicare population, state-level utilization rates varied from 48.4 to 251.3 procedures per 100,000 beneficiaries in Alaska and New Jersey. For the private insurance population, rates varied from 10.8 to 59.5 procedures per 100,000 beneficiaries in Oregon and Michigan.

"Because attention is increasingly focused on the appropriate utilization of IVC filters, our observations emphasize the continued need for investigators to use more granular nonaggregate data sources that consider both geographic and payer population variables when using administrative claims data to study utilization, so as to begin to examine the potential drivers of change," stated Richard Duszak, MD, FACR, professor and vice chair for health policy and practice in the department of radiology and imaging sciences at Emory University and senior affiliate research fellow at the Neiman Institute.
-end-
To obtain a copy of the study or to arrange an interview with a Neiman Institute spokesperson, contact Nichole Gay at (703) 648-1665 or ngay@neimanhpi.org.

About the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute

The Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute is one of the nation's leading medical imaging socioeconomic research organizations. The Neiman Institute studies the role and value of radiology and radiologists in evolving health care delivery and payment systems and the impact of medical imaging on the cost, quality, safety and efficiency of health care. Visit us at http://www.neimanhpi.org and follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook

Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute

Related Medicare Articles:

Study: Medicare could overpay medicare advantage plans by $200 billion over ten years
Research conducted at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found that current trends in diagnostic coding for patient risk scores will lead to Medicare overpaying Medicare Advantage (MA) plans substantially through 2026-likely to the tune of hundreds of billions of dollars.
10,000 Medicare patients die in the seven days after discharge from the ED
Researchers found that, each year, about 10,000 generally healthy patients die in the seven days after discharge from the ED.
Hospitals in Medicare ACOs reduced readmissions faster
The Accountable Care Organization model of paying for health care appears to help reduce hospital readmissions among Medicare patients discharged to skilled nursing facilities, a new study suggests.
Highest out-of-pocket cancer spending for Medicare patients without supplement
Which Medicare beneficiaries shoulder the highest out-of-pocket costs after a cancer diagnosis?
Medicare's new way of paying hospitals could cause a bundle of problems for some
Hospitals that take care of the oldest, sickest and most complicated patients could suffer financially under the Medicare system's new approach to paying for some types of care, a new study finds.
Study examines opioid agonist therapy use in Medicare patients
Few Medicare enrollees appear to be receiving buprenorphine-naloxone, the only opioid agonist therapy for opioid addiction available through Medicare Part D prescription drug coverage, according to a study published online by JAMA Psychiatry.
Possible to account for disadvantaged populations in Medicare's payment programs
A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine says that Medicare's value-based payment programs could take into account social risk factors -- such as low socio-economic position, residence in disadvantaged neighborhoods, or race and ethnicity -- but any proposal to do so will entail both advantages and disadvantages that need to be carefully considered.
The association between Medicare eligibility and rehabilitative care
Researchers from the Center for Surgery and Public Health at BWH found that becoming Medicare eligible at age 65 (as compared to age 64) was associated with an abrupt 6.4 percentage-point decline in the number of people who were uninsured and a 9.6 percentage-point increase in rehabilitation.
Telemedicine use increases among rural Medicare beneficiaries
Telemedicine use in Medicare has been increasing rapidly, and in 2013 there were over 100,000 telemedicine visits for Medicare beneficiaries.
Study examines use of telemedicine among rural medicare beneficiaries
Although the number of Medicare telemedicine visits increased more than 25 percent a year for the past decade, in 2013, less than 1 percent of rural Medicare beneficiaries received a telemedicine visit, according to a study appearing in the May 10, 2016 issue of JAMA.

Related Medicare Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#529 Do You Really Want to Find Out Who's Your Daddy?
At least some of you by now have probably spit into a tube and mailed it off to find out who your closest relatives are, where you might be from, and what terrible diseases might await you. But what exactly did you find out? And what did you give away? In this live panel at Awesome Con we bring in science writer Tina Saey to talk about all her DNA testing, and bioethicist Debra Mathews, to determine whether Tina should have done it at all. Related links: What FamilyTreeDNA sharing genetic data with police means for you Crime solvers embraced...