What are the costs of continued smoking among patients with cancer?

April 05, 2019

BottomLine: This study was an economic evaluation and it used a model to examine the costs of subsequent cancer treatment associated with continued smoking by patients after their initial cancer treatment failed. The model was developed to consider a host of factors, including expected initial treatment failure rates in nonsmoking patients, how common smoking was, and the cost of cancer treatment after initial treatment failed. The analysis conservatively suggests continued smoking by patients with cancer adds nearly $11,000 per smoking patient in treatment costs after the initial cancer treatment failed. The model has limitations and didn't quantify the potential benefits of smoking cessation.

Authors: Graham W. Warren, M.D., Ph.D., Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, and coauthors

(doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.1703)

Editor's Note: The article contains conflict of interest disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
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About JAMA Network Open:JAMA Network Open is the new online-only open access general medical journal from the JAMA Network. Every Friday, the journal publishes peer-reviewed clinical research and commentary in more than 40 medical and health subject areas. Every article is free online from the day of publication.

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