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Are narcissists more likely to post selfies and care about the feedback they receive?

April 06, 2016

New Rochelle, NY, April 5, 2016--Korean researchers studied how narcissism relates to a person's selfie-posting behavior on Social Networking Sites such as Facebook and interest in the comments they receive back. The authors describe the link between degree of narcissism and self-promotion through selfies in the article "Hide-and-Seek: Narcissism and 'Selfie'-Related Behavior" published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking website until May 5, 2016.

Jung-Ah Lee and Yongjun Sung, PhD, Korea University (Seoul, South Korea), found that individuals with a higher degree of narcissism have a more favorable attitude toward the act of posting selfies. Their involvement in the comments received to their own selfies and their interest in other people's selfies did not, however mean that they were more likely to provide feedback.

"Across all social media technologies, narcissists (as compared to non-narcissists) tend to engage in more self-enhancement strategies in hopes of gaining admiration," says Editor-in-Chief Brenda K. Wiederhold, PhD, MBA, BCB, BCN, Interactive Media Institute, San Diego, California and Virtual Reality Medical Institute, Brussels, Belgium. "However, since narcissism does not completely explain selfie posting, future studies are needed to uncover additional psychological or social factors that influence selfie posting behavior."
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About the Journal

Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published monthly online with open access options and in print that explores the psychological and social issues surrounding the Internet and interactive technologies. Complete tables of contents and a sample issue may be viewed on the Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking website. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking is the official journal of the International Association of CyberPsychology, Training & Rehabilitation.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Games for Health Journal, Telemedicine and e-Health, and Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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