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Examining association between childhood video game use, adolescent body weight

April 06, 2020

What The Study Did: Researchers looked at whether there was a long-term association between using video games at an early age and later weight as a teenager, as well as what role behaviors such as physical activity, the regularity of bedtimes and consuming sugar-sweetened beverages might play. The study was a secondary analysis of data from a study that included 16,000 children born in the United Kingdom.

Authors: Rebecca J. Beeken, Ph.D., of the University of Leeds in Leeds, England, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.0202)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflicts of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.
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Media advisory: The full study is linked to this news release.

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JAMA Pediatrics

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