Congenital rubella syndrome nearly eradicated in the US

April 07, 2006

Congenital rubella syndrome, a birth defect caused by the rubella virus (also known as German measles), has practically been eliminated in the U.S., according to a statement published in the April 2006 issue of Birth Defects Research Part A, the official journal of The Teratology Society. The journal is available online via Wiley InterScience at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/102526943.

Endorsed by the Teratology Society, the Organization of Teratology Information Specialists (OTIS), the Neurobehavioral Teratology Society, and the Behavioral Toxicology Society, the statement notes that rubella is no longer an endemic disease in this country and congenital rubella syndrome "is almost a thing of the past in the United States." Birth defects resulting from rubella may include blindness, deafness, and congenital heart disease. A rubella epidemic in the early 1960s caused more than 11,000 fetal deaths and 20,000 infants to be born with congenital rubella syndrome, but a more effective vaccine introduced in the 1970s has helped in eliminating transmission of rubella from expectant mothers to their unborn babies.

"Effectively, congenital rubella syndrome has been nearly eradicated from the United States," according to the statement. There were fewer than 10 cases or rubella reported in the U.S. last year and in the past 5 years there have only been 4 cases of congenital rubella syndrome reported, only one of which was in a child whose mother had been born in the U.S.

The remarkable success of the immunization program to eliminate rubella is due to joint efforts by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, various state and local health departments, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and the March of Dimes, according to the statement. Maintaining high rubella immunization rates is crucial to the continued success of these efforts. The statement concludes: "Effective strategies, such as continued universal childhood and adolescent immunization, must be secured to extend this success worldwide."
-end-
Article: "Joint Statement on Congenital Rubella Syndrome," Teratology Society, Organization of Teratology Information Specialists, Neurobehavioral Teratology Society, Behavioral Toxicology Society, Birth Defects Research Part A, April 2006; (DOI: 10.1002/bdra.20253).

Wiley

Related Pediatrics Articles from Brightsurf:

COVID-19 story tip: Racism amid the COVID-19 pandemic -- a path forward
Because SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, was first discovered in China, Chinese American families in the United States have reported an increase in racist experiences during the ongoing pandemic.

Commentary in Pediatrics: Children don't transmit Covid-19, schools should reopen in fall
Based on one new and three recent studies, the authors of this commentary in Pediatrics conclude that children rarely transmit Covid-19, either among themselves or to adults.

New guideline aims to transform evaluation and care of children and adolescents with ADHD
The Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics is releasing a groundbreaking guideline for the diagnosis and care of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders in children and youth in a supplement to its February 2020 issue.

Wide-ranging gender disparities remain in pediatrics
Three commonly argued justifications for the persistent discrimination and gender bias that prevent women from rising to leadership positions in the field of pediatric medicine have been debunked by a Drexel University College of Medicine researcher and colleagues in a special article published in the November 2019 issue of the journal Pediatrics.

ASMBS endorses new policy statement from American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)
The American Society for Metabolic Surgery (ASMBS), the largest organization for bariatric surgeons in the nation, has endorsed the new policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommending greater access to metabolic and bariatric surgery for children and adolescents with severe obesity.

American Academy of Pediatrics looks at use of nonnutritive sweeteners by children
Nonnutritive or artificial sweeteners are a growing part of US diets, now consumed by at least one in four children.

JAMA Pediatrics editorial: New lead testing recommendations inconclusive, but do not mean screening
An NYU pediatrician and researcher writes in JAMA Pediatrics that new recommendations on testing children for lead are inconclusive, but do not mean that we should abandon screening children for elevated lead levels.

Polio-like illness mostly of children is focus of 3 JAMA Pediatrics articles
Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) is a poorly understood polio-like illness mostly of children characterized by weakness of muscles and limbs and the presence of a spinal cord lesion.

Kids' firearm-related injuries differ: Younger kids are more likely to be injured accidentally
The reasons that children with firearm-related injuries are rushed to the nation's emergency departments differs by the intent of the person discharging the weapon, with younger kids more likely to be injured by accident and older youths more likely to be victims of an assault, according to retrospective, cross-sectional analyses presented during the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition.

Free tax services in pediatrics clinics yield high returns
During its first two years, StreetCred, a free tax preparation program developed at Boston Medical Center (BMC), helped 753 clients in pediatric clinics receive over $1.6 million in federal tax returns.

Read More: Pediatrics News and Pediatrics Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.