USPSTF recommendation on screening for bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy

April 07, 2020

Bottom Line: The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against screening for bacterial vaginosis in someone without symptoms and who is pregnant but not at increased risk for preterm delivery. Bacterial vaginosis is a common condition caused by an overgrowth of bacteria in the vagina and it has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes including preterm delivery. The USPSTF found insufficient evidence to make a recommendation on screening those who are pregnant and at increased risk for preterm delivery.  The USPSTF routinely makes recommendations about the effectiveness of preventive care services and this statement reaffirms its 2008 recommendations.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jama.2020.2684)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
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Note: More information about the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, its process, and its recommendations can be found on the newsroom page of its website.

Media advisory: To contact the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, email the Media Coordinator at Newsroom@USPSTF.net or call 202-572-2044. The full report and related articles are linked to this news release.

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time and all USPSTF articles remain free indefinitely https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/10.1001/jama.2020.2684?guestAccessKey=65882581-0679-4db4-895b-7179f28cdca5&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=040720

JAMA

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USPSTF recommendation on screening for bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against screening for bacterial vaginosis in someone without symptoms and who is pregnant but not at increased risk for preterm delivery.

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