Nav: Home

Cyclodextrin dissolves away cholesterol crystals

April 08, 2016

Cardiovascular disease from atherosclerosis is one of the most common causes of death worldwide. Inflammation plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis and cholesterol crystals are considered to be early triggers in the development of the disease.

An international team has now found that cyclodextrin dissolves cholesterol crystals and reduces atherosclerotic plaques. This is a promising therapeutic approach for treating atherosclerosis. Their find was published in Science Translational Medicine.

Cyclodextrin works by reprogramming macrophages so that they do not cause such a strong inflammatory response in blood vessels that contain cholesterol crystals. The cyclodextrin also dissolves cholesterol crystals so that the cholesterol can be excreted from the body in urine. The result is prevention of plaque formation and even atherosclerotic plaque reduction in mice. Furthermore, when researchers used cyclodextrin to treat biopsies of plaques from human carotid arteries, they found similar results.

The study points to cholesterol crystals as a target for treatment of atherosclerosis, meaning that using cyclodextrin to dissolve the crystals could affect how the disease is treated.

The original idea for the test of cyclodextrin came from Chris Hempel, an American mother whose twin daughters are affected by a rare illness called Niemann-Pick Type C disease, in which cholesterol accumulates in the body. The children are being treated with cyclodextrin with promising results.

Hempel read about previous research on cholesterol crystals conducted by senior researcher Eicke Latz from the University Hospital Bonn and his colleagues from the Center of Molecular Inflammation Research (CEMIR) at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim. She contacted Dr. Latz to suggest that they test cyclodextrin as a possible treatment for atherosclerosis.

Dr. Latzis also an adjunct professor at CEMIR. Researchers from the Oslo University Hospital in Norway, and from Australia, the USA, Denmark and Sweden also contributed to the work.
-end-
Reference:

Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming, Sebastian Zimmer/Alena Grebe, Siril S. Bakke, Niklas Bode, Bente Halvorsen, Thomas Ulas, Mona Skjelland, Dominic De Nardo, Larisa I. Labzin, Anja Kerksiek, Chris Hempel, Michael T. Heneka, Victoria Hawxhurst, Michael L. Fitzgerald, Jonel Trebicka, Ingemar Björkhem, Jan-Åke Gustafsson, Marit Westerterp, Alan R. Tall, Samuel D. Wright, Terje Espevik, Joachim L. Schultze, Georg Nickenig, Dieter Lütjohann and Eicke Latz, Science Translational Medicine (Published online April 6th, 2016, Vol. 8, Issue 333, pp. 333ra50)

Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Related Cholesterol Articles:

Experimental cholesterol-lowering drug effective at lowering bad cholesterol, study shows
Twice-yearly injections of an experimental cholesterol-lowering drug, inclisiran, were effective at reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, often called bad cholesterol, in patients already taking the maximum dose of statin drugs, according to data of the ORION-10 trial presented Saturday, Nov.
Rethinking how cholesterol is integrated into cells
Cholesterol is best known in connection with cardiovascular disease, but cholesterol is also vital for many fundamental processes in the body.
Seed oils are best for LDL cholesterol
Using a statistical technique called network meta-analysis, researchers have combined the results of dozens of studies of dietary oils to identify those with the best effect on patients' LDL cholesterol and other blood lipids.
Cholesterol leash: Key tethering protein found to transport cellular cholesterol
Cholesterol is an essential component of living organisms, but the mechanisms that transport cholesterol inside the cell are poorly understood.
New way to treat cholesterol may be on the horizon
A breakthrough discovery by scientists at Houston Methodist Research Institute could change the way we treat cholesterol.
How low should LDL cholesterol go?
New analysis shows that in a high-risk population, achieving ultra-low LDL cholesterol levels, down to <10 mg/dL, safely results in additional lowering of risk of cardiovascular events.
Does boosting 'good' cholesterol really improve your health?
A new review addresses the mysteries behind 'good' HDL cholesterol and why boosting its levels does not necessarily provide protection from cardiovascular risk for patients.
Researchers zero-in on cholesterol's role in cells
For the first time, by using a path-breaking optical imaging technique to pinpoint cholesterol's location and movement within the cell membrane, chemists at the University of Illinois at Chicago have made the surprising finding that cholesterol is a signaling molecule that transmits messages across the cell membrane.
Raising 'good cholesterol' not as effective as lowering 'bad cholesterol'
Low and very high levels of HDL, or 'good cholesterol' are associated with a higher risk of dying from heart disease, cancer and other causes, according to a study today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
New gene for familial high cholesterol
New research from Denmark reveals the gene that explains one quarter of all familial hypercholesterolemia with very high blood cholesterol.
More Cholesterol News and Cholesterol Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Biology Of Sex
Original broadcast date: May 8, 2020. Many of us were taught biological sex is a question of female or male, XX or XY ... but it's far more complicated. This hour, TED speakers explore what determines our sex. Guests on the show include artist Emily Quinn, journalist Molly Webster, neuroscientist Lisa Mosconi, and structural biologist Karissa Sanbonmatsu.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#569 Facing Fear
What do you fear? I mean really fear? Well, ok, maybe right now that's tough. We're living in a new age and definition of fear. But what do we do about it? Eva Holland has faced her fears, including trauma and phobia. She lived to tell the tale and write a book: "Nerve: Adventures in the Science of Fear".
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Wubi Effect
When we think of China today, we think of a technological superpower. From Huweai and 5G to TikTok and viral social media, China is stride for stride with the United States in the world of computing. However, China's technological renaissance almost didn't happen. And for one very basic reason: The Chinese language, with its 70,000 plus characters, couldn't fit on a keyboard.  Today, we tell the story of Professor Wang Yongmin, a hard headed computer programmer who solved this puzzle and laid the foundation for the China we know today. This episode was reported and produced by Simon Adler with reporting assistance from Yang Yang. Special thanks to Martin Howard. You can view his renowned collection of typewriters at: antiquetypewriters.com Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.