Genes, Brain and Behavior Symposium April 16

April 09, 2003

Prominent experts on genes, brain and behavior will discuss the impact of genomics on neuroscience in an all-day scientific symposium at the National Institutes of Health, April 16. Sponsored by seven NIH Institutes, the event is a satellite symposium of "50 Years of DNA: From Double Helix to Health," a month-long celebration of the genome, sponsored by the National Human Genome Research Institute. The symposium, "Genes, Brain, Behavior: Before and Beyond Genomics," will be held 8:30 AM - 5:45 PM, Wilson Hall, Bldg 1, 1 Center Drive, Bethesda, Maryland.

The sponsoring Institutes are:
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
National Eye Institute (NEI)
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

Advances in molecular genetic techniques have transformed the way neuroscientists work. Molecular shortcuts to discovery, such as knockout mice, are now routinely used to solve problems that would have been considered daunting, if not unthinkable, just decades ago. The symposium will discuss how genes and model organisms are being manipulated to gain insights into nervous system functioning and complex behavior. It will also explore how knowledge about gene expression and function is contributing to the development of new therapeutic strategies for brain and behavioral disorders.
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NIMH, NIAAA, NIDA, NIA, NEI, NIDCD and NINDS are components of the NIH, the Federal Government's primary agency for biomedical and behavioral research. NIH is part of the Department of Health and Human Services.

NIH/National Institute of Mental Health

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