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Leadership and adaptive reserve are not associated with blood pressure control

April 09, 2018

In a recently published study in the Annals of Family Medicine, Kamal Henderson, MD, et al, assessed whether a practice's adaptive reserve and high leadership capability in quality improvement are associated with population blood pressure control. The article, entitled "Organizational Leadership and Adaptive Reserve in Blood Pressure Control: The Heart Health NOW Study," reveals that adaptive reserve (i.e., the ability of a practice to weather the process of change) and leadership capability in quality improvement implementation are not statistically associated with achieving top quartile practice-level hypertension control at baseline in the Heart Health NOW project. Findings, however, may be limited by a lack of patient-related factors and small sample size to preclude strong conclusions.
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"Organizational Leadership and Adaptive Reserve in Blood Pressure Control: The Heart Health NOW Study," by Kamal H. Henderson, MD, et al Chapel Hill, North Carolina
http://www.annfammed.org/content/16/Suppl_1/S29

American Academy of Family Physicians

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