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Nature could provide the answer for blindness caused by diabetes, say experts

April 09, 2019

Mother Nature could have the answer to treating several causes of blindness, according to a ground-breaking study involving scientists from the University of Surrey and the Eugene and Marilyn Glick Eye Institute at Indiana University School of Medicine in the USA.

The scientists have found and tested compounds from a group of plants that could possibly be used to treat the causes of degenerative eye diseases such as proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

This abnormal growth of new blood vessel cells in the eye is linked to a number of types of blindness, including in premature babies (retinopathy of prematurity), diabetics (proliferative diabetic retinopathy) and older adults (wet age-related macular degeneration).

In a paper published by the American Chemical Society, the University of Surrey, together with experts from Indiana University in America and Kingston University, detailed their testing of naturally occurring homoisoflavonoids found in the Hyacinthaceae plant family and their synthetic derivatives.

The team tested how well these compounds were able to stop the growth of new blood vessels and isolated several active compounds. One synthetic derivative in particular could be used to develop future treatments. Further work is continuing to synthesize more related compounds.

According to Great Ormond Street Hospital, retinopathy of prematurity affects around 20 per cent of premature babies and mainly occurs in those who are born before week 32 of pregnancy or weigh less than 1500g.

Diabetic retinopathy is caused by high blood sugar levels damaging the back of the eye - causing blindness if left untreated. It is estimated to affect 28 million people worldwide.

Wet age-related macular degeneration is one of the world's leading causes of blindness - affecting 20 million older adults worldwide.

Professor Dulcie Mulholland, Head of Department of Chemistry at the University of Surrey, said: "It goes without saying that losing your eyesight is a devastating experience. We believe that our results hint at possible future treatments for many degenerative eye conditions and it appears that nature still has many secrets to reveal."

Professor Tim Corson, Director of Basic and Translational Research at the Eugene and Marilyn Glick Eye Institute, added: "Existing therapies for these diseases must be injected into the eye, and do not work in all patients. Our findings are a first step towards therapies that might avoid these shortcomings."

Dr Sianne Schwikkard, School of Life Sciences, Pharmacy and Chemistry, Kingston University, London (and a former Daphne Jackson Fellow 2014 - 2016, based at the University of Surrey and sponsored by the Royal Society of Chemistry) said: "The discovery of new and innovative treatments from natural sources for life-altering diseases has huge potential. This work has produced a real opportunity to further collaboration and has the potential to bring new breakthroughs in the treatment of degenerative eye-diseases."
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Notes to Editor

Daphne Jackson Fellowships enable scientists and researchers to retrain and return after a career break of two or more years taken for family, caring or health reasons. Fellowships offer individuals the opportunity to work on a research project on a part-time, flexible and salaried basis in universities and research institutes across the UK.

For more information visit daphnejackson.org or contact Catherine Barber, Communications Manager at the Daphne Jackson Trust on 01483 689166 or email DJMFT@surrey.ac.uk

University of Surrey

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