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Lab tests of blu e-vapor show no evidence of damage to human lung cells

April 09, 2019

New peer reviewed research commissioned by Imperial Brands, and conducted by the contract research organisation MatTek, shows vaping blu produces a similar effect on human lung tissue as normal air.

The study, published this month, was conducted to investigate the potential adverse effects of blu vapour on human airway tissue, compared with conventional cigarette smoke.

For the study, researchers used a 3D model of lung tissue in parallel with a VITROCELL smoking/vaping robot to assess the potential toxicity of e-cigarette vapour to human cells.

Two blu nicotine-containing vape products (blu PLUS+ e-cigarette) were tested - with and without flavourings - on real human airway tissue, alongside a conventional 3R4F reference cigarette.

The results were in marked contrast:

  • The impact of the vapour - from both flavoured and unflavoured e-liquid - on the airway tissue was similar to fresh air, even up to 400 continuous puffs. Essentially, blu vapour had no cytotoxic impact on human airway tissue under the test conditions.

  • In contrast, exposure to conventional cigarette smoke resulted in a significant and rapid decrease in lung tissue viability under the test conditions.
Lukasz Czekala, In-Vitro Research Toxicologist at Imperial Brands and study author, commented: "Until now, there have been few in-vitro studies around the potential adverse effects of vapour. This organotypic study sought to closely mimic the exposure of both flavoured and unflavoured vapour and smoke on normal human lung tissue.

"The results we observed build our belief that blu offers compelling potential as a less harmful alternative to smoking. To date, blu has demonstrated its harm reduction potential in every test we've conducted."

Dr Grant O'Connell, Head of Scientific Affairs at Imperial Brands, added: "Our latest research study further evaluates the harm reduction potential of our vaping products.

"We consider it good scientific practice that any future laboratory studies should replicate human physiology as closely as possible before any clinical trials commence, rather than relying on non-realistic human exposures and extrapolated results - both of which are regrettably overly frequent in current vaping research."

"This study reinforces Imperial's commitment to investment in new in-vitro tools and assays which eliminate the need for animal testing, as we continue our progress in substantiating the harm reduction potential of our portfolio of next generation products."
-end-


Imperial Brands

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