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Lung cancer treatments vary among the Asian communities

April 09, 2019

A study from the University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, sought to examine possible health disparities in the treatment of lung cancer within the Asian community in the U.S. In this study, rates of recommended care for non-small cell lung cancer were compared among patients in the Asian community. The authors concluded that practice patterns within different Asian ethnicities vary widely, and cultural and gender preferences appear to exist for different modalities of care.

Using the American College of Surgeons' National Cancer Database, researchers examined the records of nearly 19,000 Asian patients of various ethnic origins and the treatment they received after their diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer. The authors found that Chinese, Indian and Korean patients were more likely to receive surgery and chemotherapy, but not radiation when compared with white patients. Japanese patients were more likely to receive surgery, but less likely to undergo chemotherapy. Filipino patients were more likely to undergo chemotherapy, but not radiation. Women were more likely than men to receive surgery and chemotherapy, but not radiation.

"Our study shows the differences in care to different Asian ethnicities and that targeted interventions need to be tailored to gender and ethnicity to reduce Asian lung cancer disparities," states Dr. Alex Balekian, lead researcher.
-end-
Further results from this study will be shared at CHEST Congress 2019 in Bangkok on Thursday, April 11, at 4:15 p.m., in the Exhibition Hall. The study abstract can be viewed on the journal CHEST® website.

ABOUT CHEST Congress 2019 Thailand

CHEST Congress 2019 is a global event connecting clinicians from around the world specializing in pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine, held April 10-12, 2019, in Bangkok, Thailand, with the support of the Thoracic Society of Thailand. The American College of Chest Physicians, publisher of the journal CHEST®, is the global leader in advancing best patient outcomes through innovative chest medicine education, clinical research and team-based care. Its mission is to champion the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of chest diseases through education, communication and research. It serves as an essential connection to clinical knowledge and resources for its 19,000 members from around the world who provide patient care in pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine. For more information about CHEST Congress 2019, visit chestcongress.chestnet.org, or follow CHEST meeting hashtag, #CHESTCongress19, on social media.

American College of Chest Physicians

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