Nav: Home

NASA-NOAA satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Wallace dissipating

April 10, 2019

Tropical Cyclone Wallace was dissipating in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead. Wallace was located off the northwestern coast of Western Australia.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology or ABM noted that a Strong Wind Warning was in effect for the Esperance Coast and Eucla Coast on April 10 as Wallace continued weakening far off the coast of Western Australia.

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Wallace on April 10 and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument provided a visible image of the storm. The VIIRS image showed wind shear has pushed the bulk of the system's clouds southeast of the center, and was tearing the storm apart.

At 11 p.m. EDT on April 9 (0300 UTC on April 10), the Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued the final bulletin on Tropical Cyclone Wallace. At that time, maximum sustained winds were near 35 knots (40 mph/65 kph). Wallace was centered near 16.9 degrees south latitude and 111.9 east longitude. That's about 344 nautical miles north-northwest of Learmonth. Wallace was moving to the west.

Wind shear is forecast to increase over April 10 and Wallace is expected to dissipate by April 11.
-end-


NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

Related April Articles:

JNeurosci: Highlights from the April 26 issue
Check out these newsworthy studies from the April 26, 2017, issue of JNeurosci.
JNeurosci: Highlights from the April 19 issue
Check out these newsworthy studies from the April 19, 2017, issue of JNeurosci.
JNeurosci: Highlights from the April 12 issue
Check out these newsworthy studies from the April 12, 2017, issue of JNeurosci.
We Robot 2016 April 1-2 at University of Miami
We Robot 2016 is a conference at the intersection of the law, policy, and technology of robotics, to be held in Coral Gables, Florida on April 1-2, 2016.
Fires in Western Australia April 2015
Bushfires are inevitable in the fire-prone landscapes of Western Australia.
Fires in the Yucatan Peninsula in April 2014
April is in the middle of the dry season, which runs from January through May in this region, and naturally coincides with fire season.
TEDxNJIT event on April 3
A TEDxNJIT event will take place again on April 3, 2014, in the Jim Wise Theatre on the New Jersey Institute of Technology campus and also via an accompanying live simulcast broadcast available to viewers worldwide.
Roe deer more likely to be run over at nightfall on a Sunday in April
Traffic accidents involving wildlife are on the rise in Europe.
SAGE to publish The Bible Translator from April 2013
SAGE and United Bible Societies today announced a new agreement to publish The Bible Translator from April 2013.
SAGE to publish Measurement and Control from April 2013
SAGE and the Institute of Measurement and Control today announced a new agreement to publish Measurement and Control from April 2013.

Related April Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#530 Why Aren't We Dead Yet?
We only notice our immune systems when they aren't working properly, or when they're under attack. How does our immune system understand what bits of us are us, and what bits are invading germs and viruses? How different are human immune systems from the immune systems of other creatures? And is the immune system so often the target of sketchy medical advice? Those questions and more, this week in our conversation with author Idan Ben-Barak about his book "Why Aren't We Dead Yet?: The Survivor’s Guide to the Immune System".