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Unsolved after 116 years: International academics to discuss Hilbert's sixth problem

April 11, 2016

The University of Leicester will be facilitating interdisciplinary discussion across key mathematical and physical disciplines involved in the solution of Hilbert's sixth problem: To axiomatise the branches of physics where mathematics is prevalent.

The problem, which remains unsolved after more than a hundred years, was one of 23 posed by Hilbert in 1900 which influenced mathematics throughout the 20th century. Today, it remains one of the most influential areas of interdisciplinary dialogue in mathematics and mathematical physics.

Alexander N. Gorban, Professor of Applied Mathematics at the University of Leicester and organiser of the workshop, said "The proposed conference aims to gather top experts of Hilbert's sixth problem, to review the current achievements in the formalisation and solutions of the problem, and to formulate the main mathematical challenges and problems which have arisen from 115 years of work.

"This renewed programmatic call should be disseminated and explained together with modern achievements to the interdisciplinary research community and to a new generation of mathematicians."

With topics ranging from fluid dynamics, kinetic theory and quantum probability to geometry, mechanics and biology, the workshop will feature talks from many prominent scientists in a variety of different fields.

Supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the London Mathematical Society (LMS) and the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications (IMA), over the three day summit, a variety of presentations and sessions will be delivered by an international array of speakers from the UK, USA, Russia, France, Switzerland, Japan, Israel, Sweden, China, South Korea, Austria, Italy, Hungary and Singapore.

The University of Leicester will be hosting the workshop at College Court, Oadby from Monday 2nd to Wednesday 4th May.
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University of Leicester

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