New bioinformatics tool identifies and classifies CRISPR-Cas systems

April 11, 2018

New Rochelle, NY, April 11, 2018--Designed to improve the utility and availability of increasingly diverse CRISPR-Cas genome editing systems, the new CRISPRdisco automated pipeline helps researchers identify CRISPR repeats and cas genes in genome assemblies. The freely available software provides standardized, high throughput analytical methods that detect CRISPR repeats and accurately assign class, type, and subtypes, as described in an article published in The CRISPR Journal, a new peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available open access on The CRISPR Journal website.

CRISPR discovery (CRISPRdisco) originated in the North Carolina State University laboratory of Rodolphe Barrangou, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of The CRISPR Journal. Dr. Barrangou and colleagues Alexandra Crawley, NC State University, Raleigh and James Henriksen, AgBiome, Durham, NC, coauthored the article entitled "CRISPRdisco: An Automated Pipeline for the Discovery and Analysis of CRISPR-Cas Systems."

In this study, the researchers used CRISPRdisco to identify and classify possible CRISPR-Cas systems in 2,777 complete genomes from the NCBI RefSeq database. They emphasized the importance of being able to distinguish between complete and incomplete CRISPR systems and to determine the link between potentially complete and functional CRISPR-Cas systems in vivo and CRISPR-Cas diversity in silico. Importantly, this platform is readily available to all via GitHub and enables novices to mine for and characterize CRISPR-Cas systems in various genomic datasets.

"New bioinformatics tools, programs, and databases are helping to drive the CRISPR revolution and we're happy to provide a forum for the validation of some of these important platforms," says Kevin Davies, PhD, Executive Editor of The CRISPR Journal.
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About the Journal

The CRISPR Journal, published bimonthly in print and online, is a groundbreaking new peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert Inc., publishers dedicated to outstanding research and commentary on all aspects of CRISPR and gene editing research. Led by Editor-in-Chief Rodolphe Barrangou, PhD, North Carolina State University, the Journal covers CRISPR biology, technology and genome editing, and commentary and debate of key policy, regulatory, and ethical issues affecting the field. For complete information, please visit the Journal website. (http://www.crisprjournal.com/)

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research. The CRISPR Journal adds an exciting and dynamic component to the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. portfolio, which includes GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News) and more than 80 leading peer-reviewed journals. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 140 Huguenot St., New Rochelle, NY 10801-5215 http://www.liebertpub.com
Phone: (914) 740-2100 (800) M-LIEBERT Fax: (914) 740-2101

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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