Anniversary EAU Congress in Barcelona tops attendance registrations

April 12, 2010

Monday, 12 April 2010 - The upcoming 25th Anniversary EAU Congress in Barcelona from April 16 to 20 promises to be one of the EAU's biggest meetings in recent years with around 12,044 participants already registered to attend the annual urological event.

Organisers of one of the biggest international urology meetings in the world said that this year's conference is expected to be one of the most highly attended and, perhaps, the most extensive in terms of coverage and number of delegates and exhibitors. At least 141 exhibitors are participating in the three-day technical exhibit which opens on 17 April. Participating companies represent major sectors in medicine such as pharmaceuticals, bio-technology and informatics, diagnostics, medical associations and publishing, amongst others.

For the scientific programme, 1,500 speakers from 52 countries are due to participate in the plenary sessions, symposiums, workshops, courses and other activities slated throughout the five-day event. From the more than 3,000 abstracts submitted, 1,104 abstracts were accepted for presentations. The presentation line-up includes 66 poster sessions, 12 oral sessions and eight video sessions.

The congress will also tackle some of the most controversial issues in urology and the EAU's Scientific Committee has prepared a programme that covers a long list of urological topics ranging from paediatrics, bladder cancer, female urology, renal cell carcinoma, reconstruction and functional urology, benign prostatic obstruction, stones and minimal invasive therapy, to name a few.

The congress will open on 16 April at the Fira Gran Via Barcelona congress complex with 10 international and regional societies from Asia, the Americas, Middle East, Caucasus and Central Asia joining the EAU for joint meetings. Second-day programme highlights include the individual and specialist meetings with the 10 EAU Sections discussing controversial issues in their respective specialties.

For the press event a special expert discussion group will focus on 'Prostate cancer screening - the debate continues', scheduled on Saturday 17 April from 12.00 to 13.30 hours. With prominent European cancer experts, the highlights will include the future of European healthcare policies in terms of prostate cancer screening and the impact of the latest major trials in prostate cancer. Leading prostate cancer experts such as Profs. Fritz Schröder (NL) and Lars Holmberg (SE) will be amongst the participants in the session to be chaired by Prof. Freddie Hamdy (GB).

For the first time at the EAU press event, patient advocacy groups will also present the patient's perspective with Prof. Louis Denis (BE), secretary of the European prostate cancer coalition Europa Uomo, as one of the lead speakers and organiser. Mr. Alojz Peterle (SI), Member of the European Parliament and cancer awareness advocate, is scheduled to discuss the political views on actions against cancer.
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For more information, please contact Ms Lindy Brouwer, EAU Communication Officer, at l.brouwer@uroweb.org or go to the congress website, www.eaubarcelona2010.org.

European Association of Urology

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