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Better coffee through chemistry (video)

April 12, 2016

WASHINGTON, April 12, 2016 -- It's one of the most popular beverages in the world, and many of us rely on it to stay awake every day. But not every cup of coffee is created equal. From the bean to the brew, science can help you get the perfect cup. This week, Reactions goes on a quest for better coffee through chemistry. Check it out here: https://youtu.be/ml79faGQg_c.

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The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With nearly 157,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

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