Nav: Home

More than $16 billion spent on cosmetic plastic surgery

April 12, 2017

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill. - A new report from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) reveals that Americans spent more than ever before - $16 billion - on cosmetic plastic surgery and minimally-invasive procedures in 2016. The new report also breaks down the national average cost of surgical and minimally-invasive procedures.

Among the more popular cosmetic surgical procedures and their related costs were:
  • Breast augmentation (290,467 procedures): national average cost of $3,719
  • Liposuction (235,237 procedures): national average cost of $3,200
  • Nose reshaping (223,018 procedures): national average cost of $5,046
  • Tummy tuck (127,633 procedures): national average cost of $5,798
  • Buttock augmentation (18,489 procedures) national average cost of $4,356
Among the more popular minimally-invasive cosmetic procedures and their related costs were:
  • Wrinkle treatment injections (botulinum toxin type-A, such as Botox®, Dysport®) (7 million procedures): national average cost of $385
  • Hyaluronic acid fillers (2 million procedures): national average cost of $644
  • Chemical peel (1.3 million procedures): national average cost of $673
  • Microdermabrasion (775,014 procedures): national average cost of $138
  • Laser treatments (Intense Pulsed Light) (656,781 procedures): national average cost of $433
The national average cost of breast augmentation surgery decreased 2.7 percent from 2015. The cost for liposuction increased 6.1 percent and nose reshaping increased 5.6 percent. Botulinum toxin type A injections increased by less than 1 percent from 2015, while hyaluronic acid costs increased 5 percent and chemical peels increased 5.7 percent compared to 2015.

Cost factors for most cosmetic surgeries include the type of surgery chosen, location of surgery, surgeon's experience and insurance coverage. Fees generally do not include anesthesia, operating room facilities or other related expenses.

"The most important consideration for patients should be choosing a board-certified, ASPS-member surgeon," said ASPS President Debra Johnson, MD. "Before you undergo any procedure, make sure you're putting yourself in the hands of only the most qualified and highly trained plastic surgeons. The cost of any procedure is not nearly as important as doing your homework and selecting a surgeon whose primary focus is your safety."
-end-
About ASPS

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) is the world's largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons. Representing more than 7,000 member surgeons, the society is recognized as a leading authority and information source on aesthetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. ASPS comprises more than 94 percent of all board-certified plastic surgeons in the United States. Founded in 1931, the society represents physicians certified by The American Board of Plastic Surgery or The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. ASPS advances quality care to plastic surgery patients by encouraging high standards of training, ethics, physician practice and research in plastic surgery.

American Society of Plastic Surgeons

Related Surgery Articles:

Bullies and their victims more likely to want plastic surgery
11.5 percent of bullying victims have extreme desire to have cosmetic surgery, as well as 3.4 percent of bullies and 8.8 percent of teenagers who both bully and are bullied -- compared with less than 1 percent of those who are unaffected by bullying.
Methadone may reduce need for opioids after surgery
Patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery who are treated with methadone during the procedure require significantly less intravenous and oral opioids to manage postoperative pain, reports a new study published in the May issue of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA).
New, persistent opioid use common after surgery
Among about 36,000 patients, approximately 6 percent continued to use opioids more than three months after their surgery, with rates not differing between major and minor surgical procedures, according to a study published by JAMA Surgery.
Refusing access to surgery recovery area at a UK hospital unless WHO Safe Surgery Checklist is fully complete
New research showing that refusal to allow surgery teams to take the patient to the recovery room after surgery unless the full WHO Safe Surgery Checklist has been complete is a highly effective way to improve use of the checklist.
Robotic surgery just got more autonomous
Putting surgery one step closer into the realm of self-driving cars and intelligent machines, researchers show for the first time that a supervised autonomous robot can successfully perform soft tissue surgery.
Ultrasonic surgery reduces pain and swelling after chin surgery
For patients undergoing plastic surgery of the chin (genioplasty), the use of ultrasonic 'piezosurgery' equipment reduces trauma, pain, and swelling, compared to traditional surgical drills, reports a study in the The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery.
Annual plastic surgery statistics reflect the changing face of plastic surgery
The annual plastic surgery procedural statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), show that in 2015 there were 15.9 million surgical and minimally invasive cosmetic procedures performed in the United States -- up 2 percent from 2014.
Orthopedic surgery simulation
A unique training simulator for orthopedic open surgery (knee reconstruction with total joint replacement) has been developed by OSSim Technologies Inc. in partnership with three University of Montreal orthopedic surgeons.
Forum on how surgery can improve healthcare in SA
A national forum on surgery and anaesthesia and how it is an indispensable part of achieving universal health coverage will take place on Dec.
Meniscus injury: Real surgery or sham surgery -- which is better for patients?
Should the non-surgical approach be preferred over surgical treatment or are there still advantages offered by surgery.

Related Surgery Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Crisis
There's no greater threat to humanity than climate change. What can we do to stop the worst consequences? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can save our planet and whether we can do it in time. Guests include climate activist Greta Thunberg, chemical engineer Jennifer Wilcox, research scientist Sean Davis, food innovator Bruce Friedrich, and psychologist Per Espen Stoknes.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#527 Honey I CRISPR'd the Kids
This week we're coming to you from Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. There, host Bethany Brookshire led a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg. A Nobel Prize winner argues banning CRISPR babies won’t work Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies A CRISPR spin-off causes unintended typos in DNA News of the first gene-edited babies ignited a firestorm The researcher who created CRISPR twins defends...