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More than $16 billion spent on cosmetic plastic surgery

April 12, 2017

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill. - A new report from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) reveals that Americans spent more than ever before - $16 billion - on cosmetic plastic surgery and minimally-invasive procedures in 2016. The new report also breaks down the national average cost of surgical and minimally-invasive procedures.

Among the more popular cosmetic surgical procedures and their related costs were:
  • Breast augmentation (290,467 procedures): national average cost of $3,719
  • Liposuction (235,237 procedures): national average cost of $3,200
  • Nose reshaping (223,018 procedures): national average cost of $5,046
  • Tummy tuck (127,633 procedures): national average cost of $5,798
  • Buttock augmentation (18,489 procedures) national average cost of $4,356
Among the more popular minimally-invasive cosmetic procedures and their related costs were:
  • Wrinkle treatment injections (botulinum toxin type-A, such as Botox®, Dysport®) (7 million procedures): national average cost of $385
  • Hyaluronic acid fillers (2 million procedures): national average cost of $644
  • Chemical peel (1.3 million procedures): national average cost of $673
  • Microdermabrasion (775,014 procedures): national average cost of $138
  • Laser treatments (Intense Pulsed Light) (656,781 procedures): national average cost of $433
The national average cost of breast augmentation surgery decreased 2.7 percent from 2015. The cost for liposuction increased 6.1 percent and nose reshaping increased 5.6 percent. Botulinum toxin type A injections increased by less than 1 percent from 2015, while hyaluronic acid costs increased 5 percent and chemical peels increased 5.7 percent compared to 2015.

Cost factors for most cosmetic surgeries include the type of surgery chosen, location of surgery, surgeon's experience and insurance coverage. Fees generally do not include anesthesia, operating room facilities or other related expenses.

"The most important consideration for patients should be choosing a board-certified, ASPS-member surgeon," said ASPS President Debra Johnson, MD. "Before you undergo any procedure, make sure you're putting yourself in the hands of only the most qualified and highly trained plastic surgeons. The cost of any procedure is not nearly as important as doing your homework and selecting a surgeon whose primary focus is your safety."
-end-
About ASPS

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) is the world's largest organization of board-certified plastic surgeons. Representing more than 7,000 member surgeons, the society is recognized as a leading authority and information source on aesthetic and reconstructive plastic surgery. ASPS comprises more than 94 percent of all board-certified plastic surgeons in the United States. Founded in 1931, the society represents physicians certified by The American Board of Plastic Surgery or The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. ASPS advances quality care to plastic surgery patients by encouraging high standards of training, ethics, physician practice and research in plastic surgery.

American Society of Plastic Surgeons

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