Nav: Home

All pooped out -- this is how norovirus does it

April 12, 2018

Researchers have long sought to identify the cells in the gut that are susceptible to infection by norovirus, the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis worldwide - and now one team has pinpointed the type of cell that falls victim. The finding could eventually lead to a therapy for this troublesome virus that infects 700 million people annually, causing symptoms such as diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain and in some cases death. In previous work, Craig B. Wilen and colleagues discovered that noroviruses use the receptor CD300lf to infect cells. However, this receptor is mostly thought to be expressed in blood stem cells, not cells lining the gut, where noroviruses take hold. Here, the team fluorescently marked CD300lf-expressing cells throughout the ilea and colons of mice, homing in a small subset called tuft cells, a rare chemosensory epithelial cell type found in both mice and humans. In analyzing millions of cells, the researchers found that norovirus infects tuft cells, but not regular epithelial cells in the gut. Reproduction of tuft cells is known to be boosted in the presence of two immune signaling proteins, IL-4 and IL-25, prompting Wilen et al. to assess whether these proteins facilitate the transmission of noroviruses in mice. Indeed, they found that administering both IL-4 and IL-25 significantly increased both the proportion of mice infected with virus and the abundance of viral particles within feces.
-end-


American Association for the Advancement of Science

Related Norovirus Articles:

Protein associated with Parkinson's disease linked to human upper GI tract infections
Acute and chronic infections in a person's upper gastrointestinal tract appear to be linked to Parkinson's disease, say scientists at Georgetown University Medical Center and their collaborators at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions.
Ben-Gurion U. researchers develop membranes that remove viruses from drinking water
The 'zwitterionic polymer hydrogel' repels the viruses from approaching and passing through the membrane.
Five fast facts about norovirus
Cruise ships, nursing homes, and daycare centers are common breeding grounds for norovirus, a contagious stomach bug that infects 685 million people around the world each year.
Scientists succeed at growing noroviruses in human intestinal cell cultures in the lab
The USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture supports NoroCORE, a multidisciplinary research collaborative of 30 researchers from 25 universities who are joining forces to understand and control foodborne virus risks.
NIH-supported researchers develop novel system to grow norovirus in intestinal cells
Researchers have succeeded in culturing norovirus in human intestinal cells, a breakthrough that could help scientists develop novel therapeutics and vaccines against the debilitating effects of the virus.
Solving a 48-year-old mystery: Scientists grow noroviruses in human intestinal cell cultures
For the first time, scientists have grown human noroviruses, the leading viral cause of acute diarrhea worldwide, in human intestinal cell cultures in the lab.
New clues found to how 'cruise-ship' virus gets inside cells
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified the protein that norovirus uses to invade cells.
Luminous proteins offer new method to discover viral infections
Researchers at Umeå University have developed a new method to directly follow viral infections in living organisms.
Mille-feuille-filter removes viruses from water
A simple paper sheet made by scientists at Uppsala University can improve the quality of life for millions of people by removing resistant viruses from water.
The $60 billion question -- can we prevent norovirus?
Each year, norovirus causes over 200,000 deaths and a global economic burden of $60 billion.

Related Norovirus Reading:

Norovirus: How to Stay Safe (Consumer Health Guides Book 2)
by Eternal Spiral Books, http://EternalSpiralBooks.com

The Norovirus: Features, Detection, and Prevention of Foodborne Disease
by Paul K S Chan (Editor), Hoi Shan Kwan (Editor), Martin C.W. Chan (Editor)

Norovirus - Heilen mit Naturheilkunde und Schulmedizin (German Edition)
by Eva Marbach Verlag

Norovirus: Webster's Timeline History, 2002 - 2007
by Icon Group International (Author)

21st Century Complete Medical Guide to Gastroenteritis, Norwalk Virus, Norovirus, Authoritative Government Documents, Clinical References, and ... for Patients and Physicians (CD-ROM)
by PM Medical Health News (Author)

Epidemiología molecular de virus entéricos en niños con diarrea aguda: Infección por Norovirus y su asociación con los grupos sanguíneos ABO(H) (Spanish Edition)
by Germán Gabriel González Mago (Author)

Hand Hygiene: A Handbook for Medical Professionals (Hospital Medicine: Current Concepts)
by Didier Pittet (Editor), John M. Boyce (Editor), Benedetta Allegranzi (Editor)

Gnotobiotics (American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine)
by Trenton R Schoeb (Editor), Kathryn A Eaton (Editor)

Think Zebras
by Kathryn D. Scott (Author)

Viral Gastroenteritis: Molecular Epidemiology and Pathogenesis
by Lennart Svensson (Author), Ulrich Desselberger (Author), Mary K Estes (Author), Harry B Greenberg (Author)

Best Science Podcasts 2018

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2018. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Dying Well
Is there a way to talk about death candidly, without fear ... and even with humor? How can we best prepare for it with those we love? This hour, TED speakers explore the beauty of life ... and death. Guests include lawyer Jason Rosenthal, humorist Emily Levine, banker and travel blogger Michelle Knox, mortician Caitlin Doughty, and entrepreneur Lux Narayan.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#492 Flint Water Crisis
This week we dig into the Flint water crisis: what happened, how it got so bad, what turned the tide, what's still left to do, and the mix of science, politics, and activism that are still needed to finish pulling Flint out of the crisis. We spend the hour with Dr Mona Hanna-Attisha, a physician, scientist, activist, the founder and director of the Pediatric Public Health Initiative, and author of the book "What the Eyes Don't See: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City".