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Want to quit smoking? Partner up

April 12, 2019

Lisbon, Portugal - 12 April 2019: Kicking the habit works best in pairs. That's the main message of a study presented today at EuroPrevent 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1

"Quitting smoking can be a lonely endeavour," said study author Magda Lampridou, of Imperial College London, UK. "People feel left out when they skip the smoke break at work or avoid social occasions. On top of that, there are nicotine withdrawal symptoms. Partners can distract each other from the cravings by going for a walk or to the cinema and encouraging replacement activities like eating healthy food or meditating when alone. Active support works best, rather than nagging."

Half of coronary patients smoke and 90% of people at high risk of cardiovascular disease are smokers. ESC cardiovascular prevention guidelines advise against tobacco in any form, and people who stop smoking generally halve their risk of cardiovascular disease.2 "Smoking cessation interventions should incorporate couples where possible to achieve a smoke-free household," said Ms Lampridou.

This study evaluated the supporting role married or cohabiting partners might have in smoking cessation. The study enrolled 222 current smokers who were at high risk of cardiovascular disease or had suffered a heart attack. Partners were also recruited: 99 were current smokers (45%), 40 ex-smokers, and 83 never-smokers.

Couples attended one of four preventive cardiology programmes: EUROACTION, EUROACTION plus, MyAction Galway, and MyAction Westminster. At the start they were asked about current smoking status, history of smoking, and previous quit attempts. Smoking status was validated with a carbon monoxide breath test. During the 16-week programme, couples were offered nicotine replacement therapy with patches and gum. In one programme, participants could choose the prescription drug varenicline instead.

At the end of the programme, 64% of patients and 75% of partners were abstinent - compared to none and 55% at the start, respectively. The odds of quitting smoking at 16 weeks were significantly higher (5.83-fold) in couples who tried to quit together compared to patients who attempted it alone.

"Previous research has shown that ex-smokers can also positively influence their spouse's attempts to quit, but in this study the effect was not statistically significant," said Ms Lampridou. "As for non-smoking partners, there is a strong risk that they will adopt their spouse's habit." Ms Lampridou noted that research is needed to confirm the findings in smokers who are otherwise healthy.
-end-
Authors: ESC Press Office
Tel: +33 (0)4 8987 2499
Mobile: +337 (0) 8531 2036
Email: press@escardio.org

Follow us on Twitter @ESCardioNews

The hashtag for EuroPrevent 2019 is #europrevent.

Sources of funding: None.

Disclosures: None.

References and notes

1 The abstract 'Do married or cohabiting partners or significant others help or hinder cardiovascular patients in quitting smoking?' will be presented during Poster Session 2: Risk Factors and Prevention - Tobacco on Friday 12 April at 08:30 to 18:00 WEST in the Poster Area.

2 Piepoli MF, Hoes AW, Agewall S, et al. 2016 European Guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention in clinical practice. Eur Heart J. 2016;37:2315-2381. doi: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehw106.

About the European Association of Preventive Cardiology

The European Association of Preventive Cardiology (EAPC) is a branch of the ESC. Its mission is to promote excellence in research, practice, education and policy in cardiovascular health, primary and secondary prevention.

About EuroPrevent

EuroPrevent is the leading international congress on preventive cardiology and the annual congress of the European Association of Preventive Cardiology (EAPC) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

About the European Society of Cardiology

The European Society of Cardiology brings together health care professionals from more than 150 countries, working to advance cardiovascular medicine and help people lead longer, healthier lives.

Information for journalists attending EuroPrevent 2019

EuroPrevent 2019 will be held 11 to 13 April at the Lisbon Congress Centre (CCL) in Lisbon, Portugal. Explore the scientific programme.
  • To register on-site please bring a valid press card or appropriate letter of assignment with proof of three recent published articles (cardiology or health-related, or referring to a previous ESC Event).
  • Press registration is not available to industry or its public relations representatives, event management, marketing or communications representatives.


European Society of Cardiology

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