World's Alzheimer's disease experts to showcase latest research

April 13, 2004

CHICAGO - The newest treatment advances in Alzheimer's disease and steps toward prevention will be on display at the 9th International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders, July 17-22, 2004, at the Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia. Presented by the Alzheimer's Association, the conference is the world's premiere forum for research advances in Alzheimer's disease.

"The Alzheimer's Association's goal of delaying the disabling symptoms and eventually preventing Alzheimer's is a feasible objective that we believe the research community can achieve in the next decade," said Sheldon Goldberg, Alzheimer's Association president and CEO. "The International Conference is the most important forum for introducing the latest discoveries in Alzheimer research. This is where world research leaders and all of us affected by this disease - and that means everyone - get to see the return on the international, and the Association's, investment in Alzheimer research."

The conference is expected to attract 5,000 researchers to share groundbreaking information on the causes of Alzheimer's, how it progresses, and ways it can be monitored and treated - plus possible strategies for slowing its progression and delaying or preventing its onset.

Presentation topics will include:Alzheimer's Disease and the Alzheimer's Association:

An estimated 4.5 million Americans now have Alzheimer's disease with millions more - the Baby Boom generation - about to enter the age of greatest risk for the disease. Without a cure, the Alzheimer's Association estimates that between 11 and 16 million Americans will have Alzheimer's disease by 2050.

The Alzheimer's Association urges Baby Boomers and all Americans to "Maintain Your Brain." There is increasing evidence that changes in lifestyle and health habits such as those that help the heart - exercising, eating properly, and controlling blood sugar levels, weight, cholesterol and blood pressure - may also benefit the brain.

"When we ask Americans to 'Maintain Your Brain,' we're also asking them to learn what we know about Alzheimer's disease, understand the great progress made by the medical research community, and join us in advocating for a renewed commitment to research and improved care for those with Alzheimer's disease," Goldberg added.

The Alzheimer's Association is the world leader in Alzheimer research and support. Since 1982, the association has funded more than $150 million in Alzheimer research. Through its national network, the Association advances research, improves services and care, creates awareness of Alzheimer's disease and mobilizes support. Visit www.alz.org or call 800-272-3900.

Special Session Focuses on Imaging and Alzheimer's:

On Saturday, July 17, the Alzheimer's Imaging Consortium will hold a one-day meeting focusing on the use of all types of imaging (including MRI, PET, SPECT, CT, and others) for diagnosis, therapy, monitoring, early detection, and basic research.

Other sponsored satellite symposia and official ancillary events held during the 9th International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders will include:Conference Sponsors:
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Editor's Note: Information on the 9th International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders is available on the Alzheimer's Association's website at http://www.alz.org/internationalconference/home.html.

All news media must register for the conference. Please call 1-312-335-4078 or contact media@alz.org for a registration form.

Alzheimer's Association

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