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This week from AGU: Volcanic lightning, Texas earthquakes, and 3 new research papers

April 13, 2016

GeoSpace

New studies uncover mysterious processes that generate volcanic lightning (plus video)

Two new studies published in Geophysical Research Letters have unraveled some of the mysteries of volcanic lightning. View original footage of volcanic lightning from one of the studies here.

Texas earthquakes may have been man-made

A series of earthquakes in Texas in 2012 may have been caused by wastewater injection, according to a new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research - Solid Earth.

Eos.org

Paleofires and Models Illuminate Future Fire Scenarios

The Global Paleofire Working Group gathers to discuss technical and conceptual challenges in reconstructing paleofires.

New research papers

Orbital evidence for more widespread carbonate-bearing rocks on Mars, Journal of Geophysical Research - Planets

Insights from a 3D temperature sensors mooring on stratified ocean turbulence, Geophysical Research Letters

Extensive nitrogen loss from permeable sediments off North West Africa, Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences
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