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NSF hosts 26 hands-on exhibits at largest US science and engineering festival

April 13, 2016

Augmented reality sandboxes, mammoth robotic sculptures, the science of guitars, and actor Wil Wheaton's crowning of winners from the National Science Foundation (NSF) competition, Generation Nano: Small Science, Superheroes, are just a few NSF activities that visitors can experience at the fourth USA Science & Engineering Festival in Washington, D.C., April 15-17, 2016 the nation's largest science and engineering festival.

The free event aims to inspire next-generation inventors and innovators through more than 3,000 hands-on exhibits, experiments and live performances by science celebrities, inventors and subject-matter experts. The festival is expected to draw more than 350,000 attendees.

In NSF's section, science and engineering researchers and educators will present projects that reflect NSF-supported diverse explorations, providing a glimpse into knowledge, innovation and educational resources that result from investment in fundamental research.

Adults and children alike will enjoy opportunities to experience science and engineering up close and hands-on.

What:

USA Science and Engineering Festival

When:

Sneak peek, Friday, April 25, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Saturday, April 16, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Sunday, April 17, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Media are welcome throughout; credentials are required Friday. Press check-in will be outside room 101, near the L Street entrance in the main building.

Where:

Booth 423, Hall A

Walter E. Washington Convention Center

801 Mt Vernon Place, N.W., Washington, D.C., near Mt. Vernon Square/7th St. Convention Center Metro stop on green and yellow lines.

Why:

To engage with fascinating, interactive (often NSF-funded) exhibits and shows (detailed below)

To learn more, visit USA Science & Engineering Festival website and check out this video.

To speak with exhibitors about their work, journalists should contact NSF's Bobbie Mixon to help arrange onsite interviews: bmixon@nsf.gov, 703-292-8070.

During Sneak Peek Friday and throughout weekend festivities, @NSF will tweet stories and pictures in real time of children and adults interacting and learning. For additional up-to-the-minute information, follow NSF's official event hashtag #NSFSuperScience.
-end-


National Science Foundation

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