Nav: Home

First particles circulate in SuperKEKB accelerator

April 14, 2016

The SuperKEKB particle accelerator at the KEK research center in Japan has recently reached a major milestone: electrons and positrons have been circulated for the first time around the rings. The accelerator is now being commissioned and the start of data taking is foreseen for 2017. One of the core questions to be investigated in these experiments is why the universe today is filled almost only with matter while in the Big Bang matter and antimatter should have been created in equal amounts. Physicists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) are involved in the development of the slow-control of the detector. The group of Professor Concettina Sfienti at the Institute of Nuclear Physics at Mainz University will be working together with some 600 scientists from 23 countries to analyze the data.

As the new accelerator is designed to deliver forty times more collisions than its predecessor KEKB, the Belle detector is also being upgraded to cope with the extreme requirements of the modified collider. The German contribution to the new Belle-II detector is a high-resolution tracker that is at the heart of the device and can very precisely record the tracks left by the generated particles. It is accurate to less than half the thickness of a human hair. The team of physicists from Mainz provide the expertise to create the software required to monitor the detector and the readout electronics. This software is used to control the operating parameters of the detector and to continually monitor its efficiency. Although the high collision rate envisaged means that it is necessary to employ hardware that comes close to the very limits of what is feasible and is thus extremely expensive, the flip side of the coin is that this should make it possible to detect rare events.

"We have reached an important turning point in the development of the SuperKEKB, an accelerator that will have forty times the luminosity of the most powerful collider ever built. The experiment will supply us with a lot of new highly precise data which may also lead to the discovery of new particles," said Sfienti.

Moreover, it is hoped that evidence of very rare events that may have occurred in the early phases of the creation of our universe will be discovered, providing insight into new laws of physics beyond those of the Standard Model.
-end-


Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz

Related Physics Articles:

Diamonds coupled using quantum physics
Researchers at TU Wien have succeeded in coupling the specific defects in two such diamonds with one another.
The physics of wealth inequality
A Duke engineering professor has proposed an explanation for why the income disparity in America between the rich and poor continues to grow.
Physics can predict wealth inequality
The 2016 election year highlighted the growing problem of wealth inequality and finding ways to help the people who are falling behind.
Physics: Toward a practical nuclear pendulum
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) Munich have, for the first time, measured the lifetime of an excited state in the nucleus of an unstable element.
Flowers use physics to attract pollinators
A new review indicates that flowers may be able to manipulate the laws of physics, by playing with light, using mechanical tricks, and harnessing electrostatic forces to attract pollinators.
Physics, photosynthesis and solar cells
A University of California, Riverside assistant professor has combined photosynthesis and physics to make a key discovery that could help make solar cells more efficient.
2-D physics
Physicist Andrea Young receives a 2016 Packard Fellowship to pursue his studies of van der Waals heterostructures.
Cats seem to grasp the laws of physics
Cats understand the principle of cause and effect as well as some elements of physics.
Plasma physics' giant leap
For the first time, scientists are looking at real data -- not computer models, but direct observation -- about what is happening in the fascinating region where the Earth's magnetic field breaks and then joins with the interplanetary magnetic field.
Nuclear physics' interdisciplinary progress
The theoretical view of the structure of the atom nucleus is not carved in stone.

Related Physics Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#530 Why Aren't We Dead Yet?
We only notice our immune systems when they aren't working properly, or when they're under attack. How does our immune system understand what bits of us are us, and what bits are invading germs and viruses? How different are human immune systems from the immune systems of other creatures? And is the immune system so often the target of sketchy medical advice? Those questions and more, this week in our conversation with author Idan Ben-Barak about his book "Why Aren't We Dead Yet?: The Survivor’s Guide to the Immune System".