SCAI issues recommendations on adult congenital cardiac interventional training

April 16, 2020

WASHINGTON -- The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) has released a position statement on adult congenital cardiac interventional training, competencies and organizational recommendations. The paper was published online in SCAI's official journal Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions and addresses the rapidly growing field of catheter-based interventions in adults with congenital heart disease.

Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital abnormality and occurs in ~0.8% of all live births. The number of adults with CHD (ACHD) in the United States now exceeds the number of pediatric patients.

The statement, also endorsed by the Adult Congenital Heart Association, focuses on three major areas: eligibility for training, training environment and duration of training, and procedural volume. Key recommendations include identification of four main training backgrounds for candidates and individual determination of training period(s). The writing group specifies that during an ACHD interventional training curriculum, trainees should participate as primary operator or first assistant in at least 150 ACHD catheterization cases (100 should be interventional procedures).

"The writing group included representatives from the areas of adult congenital cardiology, pediatric interventional cardiology, and structural interventional cardiology," said Jamil Aboulhosn, MD, FSCAI, chair of the writing group and director, Ahmanson/UCLA Adult Congenital Heart Disease Center. "The recommendations made have wide applicability to trainees and established interventionalists from a variety of clinical and training backgrounds. In addition, the statement affirms the importance of institutional and team staffing, procedures and processes to ensure delivery of high quality invasive cardiac care," he continued.

The document suggests that training of future specialists for this specific population be delivered by multi-disciplinary teams that combine adult and pediatric expertise in a collaborative approach. In conclusion, members of the writing group recommend multi-society collaboration to help establish and maintain competency standards for physicians.
-end-
About the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) is a 5,000-member professional organization representing invasive and interventional cardiologists in approximately 75 nations. SCAI's mission is to promote excellence invasive and interventional cardiovascular medicine through physician education and representation, and advancement of quality standards to enhance patient care. For more information about SCAI, visit http://www.scai.org and http://www.secondscount.org. Follow @SCAI on Twitter for the latest heart health news.

Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

Related Congenital Heart Disease Articles from Brightsurf:

Low risk of COVID-19 infection found among people with congenital heart disease
Results of a retrospective analysis suggest that people born with a heart defect who developed COVID-19 symptoms had a low risk of moderate or severe COVID-19 infection, according to a new article published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association, an open access journal of the American Heart Association.

New method for in utero 4D imaging of baby hearts may aid diagnosis of congenital heart disease
Researchers at King's College London have developed a new method for helping detect congenital heart disease of a baby in pregnant mothers using MRI.

Gout treatment may aid patients with congenital heart disease
A drug used to treat gout, probenecid, may improve heart function in individuals with a particular heart defect, according to results from a small pilot study run by a University of Cincinnati researcher.

Stakeholders update newborn screening guidelines for critical congenital heart disease
A distinguished panel of medical experts, state and federal health officials, and congenital heart disease parent advocates published recommended updates to the current American Academy of Pediatrics' protocol for detecting critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) in newborn babies using pulse oximetry.

Congenital heart disease more deadly in low-income countries
Even though mortality from congenital heart disease (CHD) has declined over the last three decades as diagnosis and treatments have advanced, a new study shows that the chances for a child to survive a CHD diagnosis significantly differs based on the country where he or she is born.

Telehealth effectively diagnoses/manages fetal congenital heart disease in rural patients
A recent study of 368 pregnant mothers, led by Bettina Cuneo, MD, director of perinatal cardiology and fetal cardiac telemedicine at Children's Hospital Colorado, found that fetal congenital heart disease (CHD) was correctly identified and successfully managed according to evidence-based risk stratification.

Uncorrected congenital heart disease may lead to increased risks in pregnant women
Pregnant women with congenital heart disease (CHD) who have not had surgery to repair their cardiac condition are more likely to experience cardiac events or maternal death, especially those with certain conditions in emerging countries, according to a study published Oct.

A new framework to study congenital heart defects
In a new study published in the scientific journal Nature, a team of researchers at the Gladstone Institutes, in collaboration with the University of Luxembourg, reveal for the first time the full spectrum of cells that come together to make a heart at the earliest stages of embryo formation.

Risk of cancer among children, young adults with congenital heart disease
National registry data in Sweden were used in this study that assessed the risk of developing cancer in children and young adults with congenital heart disease compared with healthy people in the general population from birth to age 41.

Congenital heart defects vastly increase risk of heart problems later in life
An infant born with a relatively simple heart defect is far more likely to develop heart problems as an adult, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered.

Read More: Congenital Heart Disease News and Congenital Heart Disease Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.