Nav: Home

Synergy of anthropogenic emissions and atmospheric processes may cause severe haze in northern China

April 17, 2019

Regional severe haze in northern China is characterized by exceedingly high concentrations of fine particulate matter and exhibits extensive temporal and spatial coverage, thus influencing air quality, human health, and ecosystems. The causes of these severe haze events, however, are very complex and still debated.

A study led by AN Zhisheng from the Institute of Earth Environment (IEE), Chinese Academy of Sciences, published online in PNAS on April 15, reviews and synthesizes recent advances in the causes and formation mechanisms of severe haze pollution in northern China.

"The severe haze events in northern China can be regarded as synergetic effects from the interactions between anthropogenic emissions and atmospheric processes," said AN.

Researchers found that the seasonally enhanced emissions of pollutants from residential heating and efficient secondary aerosol formation and transformation could cause severe haze.

Unfavorable meteorological conditions, for example, enhanced air static stability and shallow planetary boundary layer due to aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions could also exacerbate the formation of severe haze, according to AN.

"In addition, the regional East Asian winter monsoon and westerly circulation, which are influenced by various factors, including variations of Arctic sea ice and the Siberian High, the topography of the Tibetan Plateau, and El Niño - Southern Oscillation, may also have significant influence on the formation of severe haze in northern China," AN said.

Severe haze pollution in northern China provides a unique scientific platform for gaining insights into many aspects of the relevant atmospheric chemistry and physics.

The scientists call for additional research, including on the mechanisms leading to secondary aerosol formation and the chemical/physical transformation of primary and secondary aerosols during haze development as well as the interactions and feedback cycles between haze and meteorological/climatic conditions.
-end-
This work was supported by the National Research Program for Key Issues in Air Pollution Control, the National Natural Science Foundation of China, the State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology, and the Robert A. Welch Foundation.

Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters

Related Arctic Sea Ice Articles:

Disappearing Alaskan sea ice is significant for Arctic marine ecosystem
A new study shows that plant materials originating in Arctic sea ice are significantly incorporated into marine food webs that are used for subsistence in local communities of the greater Bering Strait region.
Increasingly mobile sea ice risks polluting Arctic neighbors
The movement of sea ice between Arctic countries is expected to significantly increase this century, raising the risk of more widely transporting pollutants like microplastics and oil, according to new research from CU Boulder.
Huge stores of Arctic sea ice likely contributed to past climate cooling
In a new paper, climate scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution propose that massive amounts of melting sea ice in the Arctic drained into the North Atlantic and disrupted climate-steering currents, thus playing an important role in causing past abrupt climate change after the last Ice Age, from about 8,000 to 13,000 years ago.
Arctic sea ice can't 'bounce back'
Arctic sea ice cannot 'quickly bounce back' if climate change causes it to melt, new research suggests.
Cracks in Arctic sea ice turn low clouds on and off
The prevailing view has been that more leads are associated with more low-level clouds during winter.
Sea-ice-free Arctic makes permafrost vulnerable to thawing
New research, published today in Nature, led by scientists at the University of Oxford's Department of Earth Sciences, and at the Geological Survey of Israel, provides evidence from Siberian caves suggesting that summer sea ice in the Arctic Ocean plays an essential role in stabilising permafrost and its large store of carbon.
Going with the floe: Sea ice movements trace dynamics transforming the new Arctic
UC Riverside-led research is the first to use MODIS satellite imagery to understand long-term ocean movements from sea ice dynamics.
2019 Arctic sea ice minimum tied for second lowest on record
The extent of Arctic sea ice at the end of this summer was effectively tied with 2007 and 2016 for second lowest since modern record keeping began in the late 1970s.
Low sea-ice cover in the Arctic
The sea-ice extent in the Arctic is nearing its annual minimum at the end of the melt season in September.
Early start of 20th century arctic sea ice decline
Arctic sea-ice has decreased rapidly during the last decades in concert with substantial global surface warming.
More Arctic Sea Ice News and Arctic Sea Ice Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Climate Mindset
In the past few months, human beings have come together to fight a global threat. This hour, TED speakers explore how our response can be the catalyst to fight another global crisis: climate change. Guests include political strategist Tom Rivett-Carnac, diplomat Christiana Figueres, climate justice activist Xiye Bastida, and writer, illustrator, and artist Oliver Jeffers.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Speedy Beet
There are few musical moments more well-worn than the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. But in this short, we find out that Beethoven might have made a last-ditch effort to keep his music from ever feeling familiar, to keep pushing his listeners to a kind of psychological limit. Big thanks to our Brooklyn Philharmonic musicians: Deborah Buck and Suzy Perelman on violin, Arash Amini on cello, and Ah Ling Neu on viola. And check out The First Four Notes, Matthew Guerrieri's book on Beethoven's Fifth. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.