Nav: Home

Effect of 18F-FDG PET/CT in esophageal cancer patients with early recurrence lesions

April 18, 2009

In the initial staging of esophageal cancer, preoperative PET scan may be useful in detecting additional cases of metastatic disease before costly and toxic definitive therapy. Currently, 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT also seem to be the best available tools for neoadjuvant therapy response assessment in esophageal cancer. However, the utility and limitation of 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with esophageal cancer treated by surgical resection and post operation radiation is not clear.

A research article to be published on April 21, 2009 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology addresses this question. The research carried out by Professor Wu from Minnan PET Center and department of nuclear medicine aimed to evaluate the clinical usefulness of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the restaging of esophageal cancer after surgical resection and radiotherapy. Their initial results suggested 18F-FDG PET/CT is might be a highly sensitive diagnosis and accurate whole-body staging of asymptomatic and symptomatic recurrent esophageal cancer. 18F-FDG PET/CT guided- salvage treatment to the early recurrence lesion might improve patient survival in a considerable proportion of patients.
-end-
Reference: Sun L, Su XH, Guan YS, Pan WM, Luo ZM, Wei JH, Zhao L,Wu H. Clinical usefulness of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the restaging of esophageal cancer after surgical resection and radiotherapy.World J Gastroenterol 2009; 15(15): 1836-1842

http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/15/1836.asp

Correspondence to: Hua Wu, Minnan PET Center and Department of Nuclear Medicine, the First Hospital of Xiamen, Fujian Medical University, Xiamen 316003, Fujian Province, China. wuhua1025@163.com

Telephone: +86-592-2139527 Fax: +86-592-2139527

World Journal of Gastroenterology

Related Esophageal Cancer Articles:

Treatment improved overall survival in elderly patients with early-stage esophageal cancer
Elderly patients with early-stage esophageal cancer that received treatment had an increased 5-year overall survival when compared to patients who received observation with no treatment.
Keck School of Medicine of USC receives grant for esophageal cancer research
The Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) has been awarded a grant from the DeGregorio Family Foundation and Price Family Foundation to support research aimed at gaining a deeper understanding of how gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) increases the risk of developing esophageal cancer.
Easier diagnosis of esophageal cancer
The Institute of Biological and Medical Imaging at Helmholtz Zentrum M√ľnchen is heading the 'Hybrid optical and optoacoustic endoscope for esophageal tracking' (ESOTRAC) research project, in which engineers and physicians together develop a novel hybrid endoscopic instrument for early diagnosis and staging of esophageal cancer.
Study sheds light on esophageal cancer, offers insight into increasingly common disease
A comprehensive analysis of 559 esophageal and gastric cancer samples, collected from patients around the world, suggests the two main types of esophageal cancer differ markedly in their molecular characteristics and should be considered separate diseases.
Oral bacterium related esophageal cancer prognosis in Japanese patients
A type of bacterium usually found in the human mouth, Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum), has been found to be related to the prognosis of esophageal cancer in Japanese patients by researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan.
Presence of certain oral bacterium in esophageal cancer samples associated with shorter survival
Among Japanese patients with esophageal cancer, those whose cancer tested positive for DNA from the bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum had shorter cancer-specific survival compared with those whose cancer had no DNA from the bacterium.
Infrared light to detect early signs of esophageal cancer
Scientists have developed an endoscope that uses near-infrared light to spot early warning signs of esophageal -- food pipe -- cancer, according to research published in the Journal of Biomedical Optics today.
Study opens door to targeted treatments for esophageal cancer
Scientists have discovered that esophageal cancer can be classified into three different subtypes, paving the way for testing targeted treatments tailored to patients' disease for the first time.
Fused genes found in esophageal cancer cells offer new clues on disease mechanisms
Now, researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have characterized structurally abnormal genes in esophageal adenocarcinoma, the findings of which could pave way for developing new biomarkers in this fatal disease.
Researchers discover gene variant associated with esophageal cancer
Researchers at University Hospitals Case Medical Center have discovered that a rare genetic mutation is associated with susceptibility to familial Barrett esophagus and esophageal cancer, according to a new study published in the July issue of JAMA Oncology.

Related Esophageal Cancer Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#532 A Class Conversation
This week we take a look at the sociology of class. What factors create and impact class? How do we try and study it? How does class play out differently in different countries like the US and the UK? How does it impact the political system? We talk with Daniel Laurison, Assistant Professor of Sociology at Swarthmore College and coauthor of the book "The Class Ceiling: Why it Pays to be Privileged", about class and its impacts on people and our systems.