Nav: Home

Telestroke guidelines from American Telemedicine Association in Telemedicine & e-Health

April 19, 2017

New guidelines to help clinicians use the latest telemedicine communication technologies to provide remote care for patients with symptoms of acute stroke are published in Telemedicine and e-Health, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The guidelines are available free on the Telemedicine and e-Health website until May 19, 2017.

Bart Demaerschalk, MD, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Phoenix, AZ, and a team of authors contributed to the article entitled "American Telemedicine Association: Telestroke Guidelines." The guidelines describe the network of audio-visual communication technologies and computer systems available to link an expert stroke team with a stroke physician at a distant site and the clinicians caring for a remote stroke patient, and to deliver telestroke clinical services.

Rapid diagnosis and treatment with a clot-disrupting drug in appropriate patients following ischemic stroke can improve outcomes. The timing of treatment delivery is a critical factor in ischemic stroke.

The coauthors of the new Telestroke Guidelines are from Mayo Clinic College of Medicine (Phoenix), Ascension Health and Columbia College of Nursing (Milwaukee, WI), Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Health Sciences University (Augusta), Yale School of Medicine (New Haven, CT), University of Cincinnati (OH), Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA), University of Pittsburgh (PA), and InTouch Health (Santa Barbara, CA).

"The authors are to be commended for this outstanding work. These guidelines will be of great value to clinicians and the patients they treat," says Charles R. Doarn, MBA, Co-Editor-in-Chief of the Journal and Research Professor of Family and Community Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Ohio.
-end-
About the Journal

Telemedicine and e-Health is the leading international peer-reviewed journal covering the full spectrum of advances and clinical applications of telemedicine and management of electronic health records. Co-edited by Ronald C. Merrell, MD, Virginia Commonwealth University, and Charles Doarn, MBA, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, the Journal provides comprehensive coverage of telemedicine applications that are playing an increasingly important role in health care and provides tools that are indispensable for home health care, remote patient monitoring, and disease management. Telemedicine and e-Health is an official journal of the American Telemedicine Association, the Canadian Telehealth Forum of COACH, and the International Society for Telemedicine & eHealth. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Telemedicine and e-Health website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, Population Health Management, Games for Health Journal, and Healthcare Transformation. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 140 Huguenot St., New Rochelle, NY 10801-5215Phone: (914) 740-2100 (800) M-LIEBERT Fax: (914) 740-2101 http://www.liebertpub.com

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

Related Telemedicine Articles:

For headache, telemedicine may be as effective as in-person visit
For people with headache, seeing the neurologist by video for treatment may be as effective as an in-person visit, according to a study published in the June 14, 2017, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
Medical abortions obtained through online telemedicine shown to be effective, safe
Women in Ireland and Northern Ireland acquiring medical abortion pills through online telemedicine report successful terminations with low rates of adverse effects, according to new research published in The BMJ by Princeton University, the University of Texas at Austin and Women on Web.
Early medical abortion using medication and online telemedicine can be effective and safe
Medical abortion using online telemedicine and self-administered medication can be highly effective and safe, and outcomes compare favorably with in-clinic protocols.
Use of telemedicine for mental health in rural areas on the rise but uneven
Newly published research by Harvard Medical School and the RAND Corporation reveals a dramatic growth in the use of telemedicine for the diagnosis and treatment of mental health disorders in rural areas, but strikingly uneven distribution of services across states.
Majority of parents plan to use telemedicine for pediatric care
New findings released today by Nemours Children's Health System show 64 percent of parents polled have used or plan to use telemedicine within the next year for their child.
More Telemedicine News and Telemedicine Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...