Nav: Home

Dartmouth College brings smartwatch innovations to CHI2018

April 19, 2018

HANOVER, N.H. - APRIL 19, 2018 - Researchers from Dartmouth College will unveil developmental smartwatch technology at the ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI2018). The watch innovations will be demonstrated during the event in Montreal, Canada running from April 21 through April 26.

The research is the latest on a long list of technical designs from Dartmouth's XDiscovery Lab that seek to increase the functionality of wearables while also adding to the overall user experience.

"Smartwatches help people access info 'on the fly,' but they are far from perfect," said Xing-Dong Yang, assistant professor of computer science at Dartmouth. "Our aim is to eliminate the technical and practical barriers that keep people from using wearable devices. We look forward to presenting the future of this technology at CHI2018."

WrisText: One-handed wrist gestures for easy text entry

WrisText allows a user to compose text messages on a smartwatch without physically typing on the touchscreen interface. This enables easy text entry with the watch-wearing hand in instances when the other hand is occupied.

By simply moving the wrist in different directions, a user can answer a question with a quick "yes or "no" or even type out a more complex sentence.

"Watches are becoming more commonly used for text entry, but the process can still be awkward. WrisText provides an alternative for text entry that is quick, convenient and effective," said Yang.

The watch features a round face with an alphabetical keyboard that was found to be the most comfortable and accurate layout for wrist movement. An augmented wristband uses proximity and vibration sensors to transfer natural wrist motions into text entry. While entering text was difficult for users to learn at first, participants in a study became proficient with the system after only a few days.

The WrisText research paper earned honorable mention from CHI2018 and builds on an earlier innovation from the XD Lab that allows users to input non-textual gestures with the watch-wearing hand.

WrisText video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrC56YUxjAw

WrisText paper: http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~hci/project.html?title=WrisText

Jetto: Lateral feedback becomes a force for smartwatch interactions

Dartmouth's Jetto provides more immersive interaction for gamers, movie watchers and other smartwatch users by allowing wearers to feel when virtual objects collide within the smartwatch.

While in an early stage of development, this technical achievement provides lateral force feedback that allows wearers to experience forces that impact the sides of a watch.

"Jetto mixes the physical and virtual worlds in a smartwatch," said Yang. "This mixed-reality experience leverages the unique quality of wearables to connect what users see to what they can feel."

Jetto is built on 3D-printed gears within a pneumatic system that is embedded in a custom watch case. The system's rotating air nozzle can control the location, direction, duration and magnitude of a virtual force experienced in a watch function to make the user feel something hitting the watch edge.

To demonstrate the technology during a research study, the Dartmouth team ran a variety of video games and video clips on Jetto to test the watch's performance when objects pushed or collided into the edge of the watch screen.

Jetto video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-YqTUBQTCyo

Jetto paper: http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~hci/project.html?title=Jetto
-end-


Dartmouth College

Related Technology Articles:

How technology use affects at-risk adolescents
More use of technology led to increases in attention, behavior and self-regulation problems over time for adolescents already at risk for mental health issues, a new study from Duke University finds.
Hold-up in ventures for technology transfer
The transfer of technology brings ideas closer to commercialization. The transformation happens in several steps, such as invention, innovation, building prototypes, production, market introduction, market expansion, after sales services.
The ultimate green technology
Imagine patterning and visualizing silicon at the atomic level, something which, if done successfully, will revolutionize the quantum and classical computing industry.
New technology detects COPD in minutes
Pioneering research by Professor Paul Lewis of Swansea University's Medical School into one of the most common lung diseases in the UK, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, has led to the development of a new technology that can quickly and easily diagnose and monitor the condition.
New technology for powder metallurgy
Tecnalia leads EFFIPRO (Energy EFFIcient PROcess of Engineering Materials) project, which shows a new manufacturing process using powder metallurgy.
New milestone in printed photovoltaic technology
A team of researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität have achieved an important milestone in the quest to develop efficient solar technology as an alternative to fossil fuels.
Gene Drive Technology: Where is the future?
For this episode of BioScience Talks, we're joined by Gene Drive Committee co-chair James P.
Could Hollywood technology help your health?
The same technology used by the entertainment industry to animate characters such as Gollum in 'The Lord of The Rings' films, will be used to help train elite athletes, for medical diagnosis and even to help improve prosthetic limb development, in a new research center at the University of Bath launched today.
Assessing carbon capture technology
Carbon capture and storage could be used to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and thus ameliorate their impact on climate change.
New technology for dynamic projection mapping
It has been thought technically difficult to achieve projection mapping onto a moving/rotating object so that images look as though they are fixed to the object.

Related Technology Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#529 Do You Really Want to Find Out Who's Your Daddy?
At least some of you by now have probably spit into a tube and mailed it off to find out who your closest relatives are, where you might be from, and what terrible diseases might await you. But what exactly did you find out? And what did you give away? In this live panel at Awesome Con we bring in science writer Tina Saey to talk about all her DNA testing, and bioethicist Debra Mathews, to determine whether Tina should have done it at all. Related links: What FamilyTreeDNA sharing genetic data with police means for you Crime solvers embraced...