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Springer editor receives Butler Award

April 20, 2009

Professor Mike Cooke was presented with the Butler Award on 25 March 2009 at the Spring Scientific Meeting of the Society of Irish Plant Pathologists (SIPP) held at the State Department of Agriculture & Food, Backweston Campus, Ireland. The award is presented by the Society to an individual who is actively involved in and has made a substantial contribution to plant pathology in an Irish context. The meeting was attended by about 30 members of the Society and the presentation was made by the Society President, Dr. Kevin Clancy.

Associate Professor of Plant Pathology at University College Dublin, Mike Cooke is editor-in-chief of Springer's European Journal of Plant Pathology. His research interests focus on the epidemiology of fungal pathogens of cereals.

The prestigious Butler Award consists of an engraved silver medal carrying the SIPP logo. The award is made in memory of Sir Edwin J. Butler, born in Kilkee, Ireland, in 1874, one of Ireland's premier plant pathologists. Professor Cooke is the 6th recipient of the award.
-end-
The Society of Irish Plant Pathologists (SIPP) was founded in 1968. The objectives of the Society are to promote the exchange of information and ideas in plant pathology, to promote an interest in plant pathology amongst the community in general, to represent Irish plant pathologists internationally, and to advise on matters of importance relating to plant pathology.

Springer

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