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2 Springer plant science journals singled out by SLA

April 20, 2009

In 2009, the members of the Special Libraries Association (SLA) celebrated the 100th anniversary of their professional group. In conjunction with this centennial, the BioMedical and Life Sciences Division of the SLA conducted a poll to identify the 100 most influential journals in biology and medicine over the last 100 years.

Two Springer journals were included in the top 100: the Journal of Plant Research and Plant Ecology. The journals were described by the SLA as "important to the plant science community worldwide and to the librarians who serve them."

The Journal of Plant Research is an international publication that gathers and disseminates fundamental knowledge in all areas of plant sciences. The journal presents research articles that contribute to the understanding of plants, as well as shorter communications reporting significant new findings, technical notes on new methodology and review articles. The editor-in-chief is Hirokazu Tsukaya.

Plant Ecology publishes original scientific papers on the ecology of vascular plants and bryophytes in terrestrial, aquatic and wetland ecosystems. The journal includes studies on any aspect of plant population as well as papers on physiological, community, ecosystem, landscape and theoretical ecology. Plant Ecology also presents symposium proceedings, review articles and book reviews. The editor-in-chief is Arnold G. van der Valk.
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The Special Libraries Association was founded in 1909 and is now the international association representing the interests of thousands of information professionals in over eighty countries worldwide. The professional group includes subject specialist librarians, information center managers and publishing industry executives.

Springer

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