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This Week from AGU: Erosion by fire, aurora sightings, and 2 new research papers

April 20, 2016

GeoSpace (blogs.agu.org/geospace)
Post-Wildfire Erosion Can Be Major Sculptor of Forested Western Mountains
Erosion after wildfires can be the dominant force shaping forested mountainous landscapes of the U.S. Intermountain West, finds a new study accepted in the Journal of Geophysical Research - Earth Surface.

Asian irrigation influences East African rain
Irrigation from agriculture can directly influence climate thousands of kilometers away and even leap across continents, according to a new study published in Geophysical Research Letters.

Eos.org (eos.org)
Aurorasaurus Puts Thousands More Eyes on the Sky
Citizen scientists share real-time auroral sightings to advance research.

New research papers
Laboratory measurements of heterogeneous CO2 ice nucleation on nanoparticles under conditions relevant to the Martian mesosphere, Journal of Geophysical Research - Planets

Convective Transport and Scavenging of Peroxides by Thunderstorms Observed over the Central U.S. during DC3, Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres
-end-
Find research spotlights from AGU journals and sign up for weekly E-Alerts, including research spotlights, on eos.org. Register for access to AGU journal papers in the AGU newsroom.

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