Nav: Home

Non-inflammatory destructive periodontal disease

April 20, 2016

Although, bacteria are a critical etiologic factor that are needed to develop periodontal disease, bacteria alone are insuficiente to induce a periodontal disease. A susceptible host is also required, and the host's susceptibility as local and/or general predisposing risk factors, are important determinants of the disease status. An accurate diagnosis is often essential in developing a predictable and suitable treatment plan, which, when executed, gives a guide to the resolution of the periodontal disease's activity. The majority of all forms of periodontal diseases, are considered as microorganism-induced diseases, which promote an inflammatory host defense response against the bacteria and noxious materials from bacterial plaque.

The inflammatory process inactivates bacteria, but produces the liberation of bacterial and neutrophil derived products such as enzymes, which induce periodontal tissue destruction by lytic activities. Therefore, the characteristics of the most common periodontal disease are: presence of gingival inflammation, ulceration of the junctional epithelium, loss of connective tissue and alveolar bone, causing apical migration of the junctional epithelium and development of periodontal pockets. However, not all types of periodontal disease seem to be caused by periodontopathogenic bacteria, and not all are distinguished by an evident inflammatory process, and periodontal tissue destruction associated with periodontal periodontal pocket formation and progressive deepening. Non inflammatory destructive periodontal disease (NIDPD), is a severe destructive periodontal disease, which is characterized by periodontal attachment loss, alveolar bone loss, generalized gingival recession without pathognomonic sign of inflammation, and periodontal pocket development. Conventional periodontal therapy and antimicrobial therapy are ineffective, in preventing further progression of the disease. A NIDPD case was studied in order to analyse features of the disease, and discuss the possible etiologic factors as an association of endogenous opportunist bacteria with anatomical aspects, occlusion pattern, emotional stress and mouth breathing condition.
-end-


Bentham Science Publishers

Related Bacteria Articles:

Conducting shell for bacteria
Under anaerobic conditions, certain bacteria can produce electricity. This behavior can be exploited in microbial fuel cells, with a special focus on wastewater treatment schemes.
Controlling bacteria's necessary evil
Until now, scientists have only had a murky understanding of how these relationships arise.
Bacteria take a deadly risk to survive
Bacteria need mutations -- changes in their DNA code -- to survive under difficult circumstances.
How bacteria hunt other bacteria
A bacterial species that hunts other bacteria has attracted interest as a potential antibiotic, but exactly how this predator tracks down its prey has not been clear.
Chlamydia: How bacteria take over control
To survive in human cells, chlamydiae have a lot of tricks in store.
Stress may protect -- at least in bacteria
Antibiotics harm bacteria and stress them. Trimethoprim, an antibiotic, inhibits the growth of the bacterium Escherichia coli and induces a stress response.
'Pulling' bacteria out of blood
Magnets instead of antibiotics could provide a possible new treatment method for blood infection.
New findings detail how beneficial bacteria in the nose suppress pathogenic bacteria
Staphylococcus aureus is a common colonizer of the human body.
Understanding your bacteria
New insight into bacterial cell division could lead to advancements in the fight against harmful bacteria.
Bacteria are individualists
Cells respond differently to lack of nutrients.

Related Bacteria Reading:

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Digital Manipulation
Technology has reshaped our lives in amazing ways. But at what cost? This hour, TED speakers reveal how what we see, read, believe — even how we vote — can be manipulated by the technology we use. Guests include journalist Carole Cadwalladr, consumer advocate Finn Myrstad, writer and marketing professor Scott Galloway, behavioral designer Nir Eyal, and computer graphics researcher Doug Roble.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#529 Do You Really Want to Find Out Who's Your Daddy?
At least some of you by now have probably spit into a tube and mailed it off to find out who your closest relatives are, where you might be from, and what terrible diseases might await you. But what exactly did you find out? And what did you give away? In this live panel at Awesome Con we bring in science writer Tina Saey to talk about all her DNA testing, and bioethicist Debra Mathews, to determine whether Tina should have done it at all. Related links: What FamilyTreeDNA sharing genetic data with police means for you Crime solvers embraced...