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AGI awards diversity grants to geoscientists studying deep carbon

April 21, 2016

Alexandria, VA - The American Geosciences Institute is pleased to announce the first seven recipients of the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) Diversity Grants. We would like to congratulate Elizabeth Padilla (University of Tennessee Knoxville), Celina Suarez (University of Arkansas), Marina Suarez (University of Texas San Antonio), Jeremy Williams (Kent State University), Yadira Ibarra (Stanford University), John Paul Balmonte (University of North Carolina Chapel Hill) and Matthew Medina (University of Michigan). These grants support geoscience researchers with travel funds to national and international conferences to present DCO-affiliated research, travel funds to attend DCO-related workshops, conferences and events, funds for supporting lab or fieldwork that advances DCO-aligned research, or instrumentation time at DCO-affiliated facilities. For more information about their research, please visit: http://www.americangeosciences.org/workforce/dco-diversity-grant-recipients.

The Deep Carbon Observatory Diversity Grants program is made possible through support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and is designed to bolster participation of traditionally underrepresented geoscientists in the United States within the Deep Carbon Observatory community. The Deep Carbon Observatory is a global research program to transform our understanding of carbon in Earth. DCO is a community of scientists, from biologists to physicists, geoscientists to chemists, and others whose work crosses these disciplinary lines, forging a new, integrative field of deep carbon science.

A final solicitation for proposals is currently open, with a 6 June 2016 deadline. AGI has four $5,000 grants available for eligible applicants. For more information, please visit: http://www.americangeosciences.org/workforce/dco-diversity-grants. Geoscientists whose research aligns with the Deep Carbon Observatory's mission and decadal goals are eligible to apply if they:

1. Identify as one or more of the following: African American, Native American, Native Alaskan, Hispanic, Latino, Latina, Native Hawaiian, Native Pacific Islander, Filipino, or of mixed racial/ethnic backgrounds from these diverse groups. AND

2. Are pursuing doctoral degrees, who are employed as post-doctoral researchers or are early-career, assistant professors.
-end-
For questions regarding this opportunity, please contact Workforce Development Specialist Heather Houlton at hrh@americangeosciences.org.

The American Geosciences Institute is a nonprofit federation of geoscientific and professional associations that represents more than 250,000 geologists, geophysicists and other earth scientists. Founded in 1948, AGI provides information services to geoscientists, serves as a voice of shared interests in the profession, plays a major role in strengthening geoscience education, and strives to increase public awareness of the vital role the geosciences play in society's use of resources, resiliency to natural hazards, and interaction with the environment.

American Geosciences Institute

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