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Researchers identify new mechanism to target 'undruggable' cancer gene

April 21, 2016

(NEW YORK, NY, April 18, 2016) -- RAS genes are mutated in more than 30 percent of human cancers and represent one of the most sought-after cancer targets for drug developers. However, this goal has been elusive because of the absence of any drug-binding pockets in the mutant RAS protein. A new study published in the April 20 issue of the journal Cell by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai led by E. Premkumar Reddy, PhD, has identified a new mechanism for targeting this important cancer gene.

[To watch Dr. Reddy discussing findings click here.] #Rigosertib #MountSinaiNews

Mutations in RAS genes (HRAS, KRAS and NRAS) are frequently observed in many of the most common and lethal tumors, including cancers of the pancreas, lung and colon. Although molecular oncologists have made significant headway in understanding these mutations and their impact on cellular signaling, little progress has been made towards developing drugs that systematically target the RAS oncogenes. This lack of progress has led many in the field to label RAS an "undruggable" cancer gene.

Dr. Reddy and a team of scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine, The Scripps Cancer Research Institute, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and the New York Structural Biology Center have identified the first small molecule able to simultaneously inhibit the different signaling pathways activated by RAS oncogenes. This small molecule, also called rigosertib or ON01910.Na, acts as a protein-protein interaction inhibitor that prevents binding between RAS and signaling proteins (including RAF, PI3K and others) that turn a cell into a cancer cell. The multi-disciplinary team performed structural experiments to confirm the mode of action for rigosertib and also demonstrated the potential for this targeted mechanism in the treatment of several RAS-driven cancers.

"This discovery is a significant breakthrough for the cancer field," said Dr. Reddy, a Professor of Oncological Sciences at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. "Rigosertib's mechanism of action represents a new paradigm for attacking the intractable RAS oncogenes. Our current focus is to use the information from our studies with rigosertib to design the next generation of small molecule RAS-targeting therapies, and we are excited to have recently identified several compounds which we think improve on the qualities of rigosertib."

This drug is currently in Phase III clinical trials for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) at multiple sites including Mount Sinai.
-end-
Funding for the study was provided by Onconova Therapeutics Inc. and the National Institutes of Health.

Video of Dr. Reddy discussing findings and animation of the molecule can be seen here: https://youtu.be/p3YhamjV-yU.

About the Mount Sinai Health System

The Mount Sinai Health System is an integrated health system committed to providing distinguished care, conducting transformative research, and advancing biomedical education. Structured around seven hospital campuses and a single medical school, the Health System has an extensive ambulatory network and a range of inpatient and outpatient services--from community-based facilities to tertiary and quaternary care.

The System includes approximately 6,100 primary and specialty care physicians; 12 joint-venture ambulatory surgery centers; more than 140 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, Long Island, and Florida; and 31 affiliated community health centers. Physicians are affiliated with the renowned Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which is ranked among the highest in the nation in National Institutes of Health funding per investigator. The Mount Sinai Hospital is ranked as one of the nation's top 10 hospitals in Geriatrics, Cardiology/Heart Surgery, and Gastroenterology, and is in the top 25 in five other specialties in the 2015-2016 "Best Hospitals" issue of U.S. News & World Report. Mount Sinai's Kravis Children's Hospital also is ranked in seven out of ten pediatric specialties by U.S. News & World Report. The New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai is ranked 11th nationally for Ophthalmology, while Mount Sinai Beth Israel is ranked regionally.

For more information, visit http://www.mountsinai.org or find Mount Sinai on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine

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