McMaster University engineering professor receives Humboldt Research Award

April 22, 2008

Dr. Jamal Deen, professor of electrical and computer engineering at McMaster University, has been awarded a prestigious Humboldt Research Award for his work in electrical, electronic and communications engineering.

Humboldt Research Awards are granted to outstanding scientists and scholars whose fundamental discoveries, new theories, or insights have had a significant impact on their own discipline and who are expected to continue producing cutting-edge achievements in future. Award winners are invited to spend a period of up to one year cooperating on a long-term research project with specialist colleagues at a research institution in Germany. The research award also honours the academic achievements of the award winner's lifetime research work.

Professor Deen is currently in Germany where he is being hosted by Prof. Dr.-Ing. Georg Böck, Technische Universität Berlin and Prof. Dr. Frank Schwierz, Technische Universität Ilmenau until the end of June.

During his stay in Germany, Dr. Deen is involved in research that focuses on modeling of nano-scale semiconductor devices and their applications to millimeter wave and microwave systems. These very high-frequency electronic systems are being proposed for applications in short range personal area networks, for high data rate communications, near range radars for vehicular sensor applications including collision avoidance systems, and software defined radios. Near term consumer applications include wireless multimedia distribution and wireless gigabit Ethernet in offices and homes. Other applications being pursued for these millimeter-wave systems are real-time atmospheric profiling for air-traffic control use, forecasting severe weather conditions and atmospheric sensing for homeland security.

Professor Deen is a Canada Research Chair in Information Technology and Director of the Micro- and Nano-Systems Laboratory at McMaster. He is a recipient of numerous awards and recognitions including election as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and Fellow, Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering, and Fellow of the Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers.
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McMaster University

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