Columbia Business School's Frank Lichtenberg awarded by the Emerald Literati Network

April 22, 2011

New York, NY, April 22, 2011 -- Columbia Business School is proud to announce that Frank R. Lichtenberg, Courtney C. Brown Professor of Business of Finance and Economics and the Healthcare and Pharmaceutical Management Program, was awarded a 2011 Outstanding Author Contribution Award by the Emerald Literati Network. The award recognizes an author who was nominated by the editors of a book series published by Emerald Group Publishing, a leading scholarly publisher of journals and books in business and management and related disciplines. Each editor nominated a contributing writer that submitted the most impressive piece of work submitted to the outlet throughout 2010.

Professor Lichtenberg's chapter, "The Effect of Drug Vintage on Survival: Micro Evidence from Puerto Rico's Medicaid Program" was published in Advances in Health Economics and Health Services Research. The book series studies topics in health economics and the related field of health services research. Professor Lichtenberg's chapter was based on his research conducted using micro data on virtually all of the drugs and diseases of over 500,000 people enrolled in Puerto Rico's Medicaid program. The paper examined the impact of the vintage (original FDA approval year) of drugs used to treat a patient on the patient's 3-year probability of survival, controlling for demographic characteristics, and found that the actual mortality rate was about 16 percent lower than it would have been if all drugs utilized in 2000 had been pre-1970 drugs.

Professor Lichtenberg's research examines how the introduction of new technology arising from research and development affects the productivity of companies, industries and nations. Recently, he has studied the impact of new drugs on longevity and hospitalization rates, the effect of computers on productivity in business and government organizations and the consequences of takeovers and LBOs for efficiency and employment. A research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, Lichtenberg has received numerous research fellowships and grants.
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About Columbia Business School

Led by Dean Glenn Hubbard, the Russell L. Carson Professor of Finance and Economics, Columbia Business School seeks to provide a truly global business education that lasts and evolves over a lifetime, preparing students for strong leadership in any industry. The School's cutting-edge curriculum bridges pioneering academic theory with industry practice, imparting not only functional skills, but the entrepreneurial mindset required to recognize and capture opportunity in a competitive business environment. Beyond academic rigor and teaching excellence, the School offers programs that are designed to give students practical experience making decisions in real-world environments. The strength of its ideas, the breadth and accessibility of its alumni network, and the extent of its connections to New York City combine to make Columbia Business School one of the most innovative and dynamic business communities in the world. The School offers MBA and Executive MBA (EMBA) degrees, as well as nondegree executive education programs. For more information, visit www.gsb.columbia.edu.

Columbia Business School

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