Nav: Home

Not drinking water associated with consuming more calories from sugary drinks

April 22, 2019

Bottom Line: This study examined how drinking water was associated with the amount of calories children, adolescents and young adults consume from sugar-sweetened beverages, including sodas, fruit drinks and sports drinks. Among 8,400 participants in a nationally representative survey (ages 2-5, 6-11 and 12-19 years), about one-fifth reported no water intake on a given day. Not drinking water was associated with consuming more calories from sugary beverages. After accounting for sociodemographic factors, no water intake was associated with intake of 93 calories and 4.5 percent more calories from sweetened drinks among participants ages 2 to 19. The magnitude of that caloric intake varied by age and racial/ethnic groups. For example, non-Hispanic white children who didn't drink water consumed an extra 122 calories from sugary beverages while Hispanic children consumed an extra 61 calories from sweetened drinks. The study data doesn't allow for inferences about causality but researchers report the findings demonstrate that children, adolescents and young adults should drink water every day to avoid consuming extra calories and sugar.

Authors: Asher Y. Rosinger, Ph.D., M.P.H., Pennsylvania State University, University Park, and coauthors

(doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.0693)

Editor's Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.
-end-
Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article: This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/2731125?guestAccessKey=b031fa95-125f-4902-a45a-cf26169f5dd4&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=042219

JAMA Pediatrics

Related Drinking Water Articles:

New solar material could clean drinking water
Providing clean water to Soldiers in the field and citizens around the world is essential, and yet one of the world's greatest challenges.
Aluminum may affect lead levels in drinking water
Until recently, researchers have not inspected the interplay between three common chemicals found in drinking water.
Natural contaminant threat to drinking water from groundwater
Climate change and urbanisation are set to threaten groundwater drinking water quality, new research from UNSW Sydney shows.
Fresh clean drinking water for all could soon to be a reality in Pakistan
A fresh, clean water supply will be a reality in Pakistan, particularly in South Punjab, following the announcement of an international partnership spearheaded by the Pakistan government, alongside other key stakeholders, and driven by the University of Huddersfield.
Keeping lead out of drinking water when switching disinfectants
Researchers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St.
Solar power with a free side of drinking water
An integrated system seamlessly harnesses sunlight to cogenerate electricity and fresh water.
'Liquid forensics' could lead to safer drinking water
Ping! The popular 1990 film, The Hunt for Red October, helped introduce sonar technology on submarines to pop culture.
Progress in hunt for unknown compounds in drinking water
When we drink a glass of water, we ingest an unknown amount of by-products that are formed in the treatment process.
Arsenic in drinking water may change heart structure
Among young adults, drinking water contaminated with arsenic may lead to structural changes in the heart that raise their risk of heart disease.
Not drinking water associated with consuming more calories from sugary drinks
This study examined how drinking water was associated with the amount of calories children, adolescents and young adults consume from sugar-sweetened beverages, including sodas, fruit drinks and sports drinks.
More Drinking Water News and Drinking Water Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: IRL Online
Original broadcast date: March 20, 2020. Our online lives are now entirely interwoven with our real lives. But the laws that govern real life don't apply online. This hour, TED speakers explore rules to navigate this vast virtual space.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#574 State of the Heart
This week we focus on heart disease, heart failure, what blood pressure is and why it's bad when it's high. Host Rachelle Saunders talks with physician, clinical researcher, and writer Haider Warraich about his book "State of the Heart: Exploring the History, Science, and Future of Cardiac Disease" and the ails of our hearts.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Falling
There are so many ways to fall–in love, asleep, even flat on your face. This hour, Radiolab dives into stories of great falls.  We jump into a black hole, take a trip over Niagara Falls, upend some myths about falling cats, and plunge into our favorite songs about falling. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.