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Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease shown to affect the development of coronary artery calcification

April 23, 2015

April 23, 2015, Vienna, Austria: Data revealed today at The International Liver CongressTM 2015 show that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) plays a role in the early stages of coronary atherosclerosis and in its more severe form it can also promote the development of coronary artery calcification (CAC).

Findings showed that the impact of NAFLD varies significantly depending on the severity of CAC at baseline. In those without CAC, NAFLD significantly affected the development of atherosclerosis; however, in patients with existing CAC at baseline NAFLD did not affect progression of the disease.

A total of 1,732 patients were included in the study:
  • Out of 1,732 patients who underwent serial CAC score evaluation, 847 patients had NAFLD and 885 patients did not have NAFLD.

  • The baseline CAC score was higher in those with NAFLD and a greater number of these patients displayed progression (48.8% vs. 38.4%, p<0.001 in subjects with vs. without NAFLD)

  • NAFLD was prospectively associated with progression of CAC score (OR 1.53, 95% CI: 1.26-1.85, p<0.001)

  • Analysis according to the severity of NAFLD showed that NAFLD in its more severe form promotes progression of CAC (adjusted OR 1.77, 95% CI: 1.08-2.88, p=0.022)

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About The International Liver Congress™

This annual congress is the biggest event in the EASL calendar, attracting scientific and medical experts from around the world to learn about the latest in liver research. Specialists share research studies and findings, and discuss the hottest topics related to liver disease. This year, the congress is expected to attract approximately 10,000 delegates from all corners of the globe. 2015 is a very special year for EASL and the hepatology community as they will celebrate the 50th annual meeting. The International Liver Congress™ takes place from April 22-26, 2015, Vienna, Austria.

About EASL

Since EASL's foundation in 1966, this not-for-profit organisation has grown to over 4,000 members from more than 100 countries around the world. EASL is the leading liver association in Europe, it attracts the foremost hepatology experts and has an impressive track record in promoting research in liver disease, supporting wider education and promoting changes in European liver policy.

Contact

For more information, please contact the ILC Press Office at:

ilc.press@easloffice.eu or
+44 (0)20 3580 5444

European Association for the Study of the Liver

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