Six minority scholars selected for fellowship on health disparities

April 24, 2001

WASHINGTON -- Six minority scholars have been selected to receive the first grants awarded by the Center for the Advancement of Health and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation for the study of health disparities by race, ethnicity, gender and socioeconomic status.

The two-year fellowships, awarding recipients up to $50,000 a year, are for scholars who hold a doctorate in fields related to the study of determinants of health. They will pursue their research at the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research, the Harvard Center for Society and Health and the Morgan State University Center for Urban Health Assessment, Evaluation and Policy Research.

The recipients are:

Carlotta M. Arthur, of Indianapolis, a Ph.D. candidate in clinical psychology at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, currently on clinical internship at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. She has a B.S. in metallurgical engineering from Purdue University and an M.A. in psychology from Stony Brook. She will study at Harvard.

Ly Uyen Nguyen, of Silver Spring, Md., a legislative assistant in the office of Rep. Bobby Scott of Virginia. She received an M.A. and a Ph.D. in clinical/community psychology from the University of Maryland and a B.A. from the University of Michigan. She will study at Morgan State.

Dean Robinson, of Amherst, Mass., an assistant professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts. He received an M.A., M.Phil. and Ph.D. in political science from Yale University and an A.B. with honors in political science from Stanford University. He will study at Harvard.

Ronica N. Rooks, of Hyattsville, Md., a postdoctoral fellow in epidemiology at the National Institute on Aging. She received an M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Maryland at College Park and a B.A. in sociology/anthropology and economics from St. Mary's College of Maryland. She will study at the University of Michigan.

Mercedes Rubio, of Bakersfield, Calif., who recently received her Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan, where she received her M.A. in sociology and where she will pursue the fellowship. She received a B.A. in sociology from California State University at Bakersfield.

Kim Dobson Sydnor, of Baltimore, who recently received her Ph.D. in public health from Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health and is being inducted into the Alpha Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. She received her B.S. in psychology from Morgan State University, where she will pursue the fellowship.

"Health is a precious commodity, an important individual resource and a valuable public good," said Jessie Gruman, Ph.D., executive director of the Center for the Advancement of Health. "But in dealing with whole populations, individual efforts are dwarfed by constant exposure to such powerful problems as poverty, inequality, substandard housing, blighted and unsafe neighborhoods and inadequate education."

Barbara Krimgold, director of the Kellogg Scholars program, said, "There is a dramatic need for minority scientists and policy makers not only to be represented but to take leadership roles in promoting good health and in developing health and social policy solutions for the 21st century for our increasingly diverse population."

The Kellogg Scholars will examine the causes of health disparities by race/ethnicity, gender and socioeconomic status and consider policy solutions. When fully in effect after the pilot phase, the Kellogg Foundation Minority Scholars in Health Disparities will study at a number of U.S. sites and collaborate with similar programs in other countries.
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The Center for the Advancement of Health is an independent nonprofit organization funded by foundations and public agencies to promote greater recognition of how psychological, social, behavioral, economic and environmental factors influence health and illness.

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation was established in 1930 "to help people help themselves through the practical application of knowledge and resources to improve their quality of life and that of future generations." Its programming activities center around the common vision of a world in which each person has a sense of worth; accepts responsibility for self, family, community and societal well-being; and has the capacity to be productive and to help create nurturing families, responsive institutions and healthy communities.Attn: CA, IN, MD, MA, MI, NY, TX

Center for Advancing Health

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