Tackling The Long Term Problem Of Antibiotic Resistance

April 24, 1998

(Antibiotic resistance: an increasing problem?)

In an editorial in this week's BMJ Professor Hart from the University of Liverpool considers the conclusions drawn by the House of Lord's Select Committee on Science and Technology which offers answers to the concerns:- is there a problem of antibiotic resistance; how does resistance arise; whose fault is it and what can be done to overcome the problem?

Contact:

Professor C Hart, Professor of Medical Microbiology, University of Liverpool, PO Box 147 Liverpool cahmm@liv.ac.uk
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BMJ

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