Uterus sparing surgery is a safe and effective treatment for pelvic organ prolapse

April 26, 2009

LINTHICUM, MD, April 26, 2009-Researchers presented data at the 104th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA) showing that uterus sparing surgery is an effective and safe treatment for women who want to preserve the integrity of vaginal function after pelvic organ prolapse. Hysterectomy may not be the only option for women with pelvic organ prolapse.

In the first long-term follow-up study of uro-genital prolapse repair associated with uterus preservation, researchers showed that the surgery can be effective (vaginal prolapse of less than or equal to grade 2 and cervix and/or vaginal apex remaining well supported more than six centimeters above the hymen plane). Researchers also found that 82.97 percent of the 47 patients were satisfied with the treatment results. None of the patients required further surgery and few patients reported persisting symptoms. Three patients reported persistence of voiding symptoms and six patients reported persistence of storage symptoms. Two patients reported de novo urgency and four reported de novo urinary incontinence. Sexual activity was maintained in 95.5 percent of patients.

"This study is important because it is the first long-term look at uterus sparing surgery for pelvic organ prolapse," said Anthony Y. Smith, MD, an AUA spokesman. "The findings are encouraging, not only because the procedures were so effective, but also because they will help to dispel the myth that a hysterectomy is the only treatment for pelvic organ prolapse."
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NOTE TO REPORTERS: Experts are available to discuss this study outside normal briefing times. To arrange an interview with an expert, please contact the AUA Communications Office at the number above or e-mail Lacey Dean at LDean@AUAnet.org.

Costantini, E; Lazzeri, M; Zucchi, A; Mearini, L; Del Zingaro, M; Porena, M. Long-term follow-up of uterus sparing surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP). J Urol, suppl. 2009: 181, 4, abstract 1355.

About the American Urological Association: Founded in 1902 and headquartered near Baltimore, Maryland, the American Urological Association is the pre-eminent professional organization for urologists, with more than 16,000 members throughout the world. An educational nonprofit organization, the AUA pursues its mission of fostering the highest standards of urologic care by carrying out a wide variety of programs for members and their patients.

American Urological Association

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