Nav: Home

Nanotechnology designed to speed up the hardening of concrete

April 26, 2017

Researchers at Tecnalia and the ICMCB-CNRS have recently published the article "Ultra-Fast Supercritical Hydrothermal Synthesis of Tobermorite under Thermodynamically Metastable Conditions" in the prestigious scientific journal Angewandte Chemie.

The article proposes an ultrarapid synthesis of nano-tobermorite, a nanoparticle used to speed up the hardening of concrete and regarded as a high-added value addition. The possibility of producing tobermorite nanofibres in water in supercritical conditions (400 ?C and 235 bar) has been demonstrated, when above 200 ?C it had been thought to be impossible. What is more, the outcome is a product of a higher quality made possible by the fact that a piece of non-traditional equipment, which allows the conditions and reaction times to be thoroughly monitored, has been developed.

The technology developed is, according to the researchers involved, "The Advanced Manufacturing Technique" for producing nanoparticles; it is and will be very important for any SME in the field of nanotechnology since it enables two aspects that are intrinsic to industrial production to be achieved: quantity and quality. Firstly, tobermorite nanoparticles can be synthesised within the space of 10 seconds as opposed to several days taken by traditional synthesis methods. Secondly, the synthesis method using supercritical fluids produces better replicas of natural tobermorite, in other words, it allows more perfect nanoparticles to be produced.
-end-
Furthermore, the journal has designated the work as a Very Important Paper, and frontispiece, in other words, it is regarded as being within a 5th percentile and a showcase of the publication given that it has been selected as the back cover. This work is the outcome of collaboration between Tecnalia, the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country, the University of Bordeaux and the ICMCB-CNRS within the framework of the euro-regional campus of excellence Euskampus-IDEX of Bordeaux.

Elhuyar Fundazioa

Related Nanotechnology Articles:

MEDLINE indexes Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology
Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, an important journal published by Benthm Science, is accepted to be included in MEDLINE.
Nanotechnology and nanopore sequencing
DNA is the hereditary material in our cells and contains the instructions for them to live, behave, grow, and develop.
New research helps to meet the challenges of nanotechnology
Scientists at Swansea University show nanoscale modifications to the edge region of nanocontacts to nanowires can be used to engineer the electrical function of the interfaces.
Nanotechnology: Lighting up ultrathin films
Based on a study of the optical properties of novel ultrathin semiconductors, researchers of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich have developed a method for rapid and efficient characterization of these materials.
Going green with nanotechnology
Reducing the environmental impact of organic solar cell production, building more efficient energy storage: W├╝rzburg-based research institutes have provided for progress in the Bavarian project association UMWELTnanoTECH.
More Nanotechnology News and Nanotechnology Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...