Nav: Home

More women with atrial fibrillation die after ER discharge than men

April 26, 2017

(Edmonton, AB) Yet more evidence can be added to the growing literature that shows women with cardiovascular disease may receive different health care and experience worse outcomes than men.

A study analyzing data from 21,062 Albertans discharged from hospital emergency rooms after presenting primarily for atrial fibrillation/flutter (AFF) showed that 1.3 per cent of women and 0.9 per cent of men died up to one month later. That translates to 40 per cent more women than men.

"We found this to be true after adjusting for factors such as age and other health-related variables," said Rhonda Rosychuk, a statistician and professor in Pediatrics at the U of A. "It's an unexpected discrepancy."

The study also showed that women experienced shorter or longer wait times to see a physician and specialist in follow-up care depending on other factors.

It's far too early to draw any causal connections with the higher death rates, explained Rosychuk.

"Further examination is required to determine if these differences are systemic, for example, related to care delivery."

But there's no denying the consequence of these findings given the mortality and time to death varied based on sex, she added.

"Overall, emergency, family medicine and specialist clinician groups should be aware of these differences and do their best to ensure evidence-based management is provided to both men and women."

This is the first study to establish sex-based difference in outcomes after discharged from Alberta emergency departments after AFF presentation. Previous investigators have identified numerous sex-based differences in AFF.
-end-
The study was published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology and funding was received from the Women & Children's Health Research Institute and Alberta Health. The University of Alberta collaborators on this project were Michelle Graham, Brian Holroyd, Xuechen Zhang, and Brian Rowe.

University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry

Related Cardiovascular Disease Articles:

More patients with cardiovascular disease now die at home than in the hospital
In a new study, Haider Warraich, MD, of Brigham and Women's Hospital, and colleagues assessed place of death for CVD patients from 2003 to 2017, finding that home has surpassed the hospital as the most common place of death for these patients.
Ultrasound: The potential power for cardiovascular disease therapy
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications volume 4, issue 2, pp.
Despite the ACA, millions of Americans with cardiovascular disease still can't get care
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death for Americans, yet millions with CVD or cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) still can't access the care they need, even years after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA).
Excess weight and body fat cause cardiovascular disease
In the first Mendelian randomization study to look at this, researchers have found evidence that excess weight and body fat cause a range of heart and blood vessel diseases (rather than just being associated with it).
Disease remission associated with 80% reduction in risk of cardiovascular outcomes
The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2019) demonstrate that remission in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is associated with an 80% reduction in risk of cardiovascular outcomes.
More Cardiovascular Disease News and Cardiovascular Disease Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...