Nav: Home

Identifying the use of tinder fungi among neolithic communities at la Draga

April 26, 2018

Inhabitants of the Neolithic community at la Draga (Banyoles, Girona) already used fungi to light or transport fires 7300 years ago. The discovery represents one of the oldest examples of technological use of fungi documented until now and is the result of several archaeological interventions at the site, which have also yielded an exceptional collection of these organisms, unique in all of prehistoric Europe.

The study of this atypical set of remains, published recently in the journal PLOS ONE, was conducted by Marian Berihuete-Azorín (Hohenheim University), Josep Girbal (UAB), Raquel Piqué (UAB), Antoni Palomo (Museum of Archaeology of Catalonia) and Xavier Terradas (CSIC-IMF).

"Despite the use of fire being well documented, at the la Draga site we had not yet found proof of the materials used to light or transport it. Data gathered points to the majority of fungi recovered were selected, taken to the forest surrounding the site, dried and stored, with the intention of using them as tinder. In addition, it was evident in two of the samples we analysed that they were being used for this purpose, which proved our hypothesis", explains Raquel Piqué, researcher at the UAB Department of Prehistory.

The site of la Draga is one of the exceptional examples for the study of archaeological remains, which remain under the phreatic level, and this has allowed researchers to recover up to 86 different individuals, some of them complete, and conduct a taxonomic study which allowed to verify the presence of six fungi species: Skeletocutis nivea, Coriolopsis gallica, Daedalea quercina, Daldinia concentrica, Ganoderma adspersum and Lenzites warnieri.

"Being able to recover these remains is extraordinary, given that their conservation as archaeological material is very difficult due to their easiness to decompose", adds Antoni Palomo, research at the MAC and the UAB.

The majority of fungi recovered at la Draga are polypore and can both grow on dead tree trunks and parasitise living trees. They are non-edible species which have been traditionally used to light fires, and are therefore known as "tinder-fungi". Their woody structure makes them high inflammable and therefore ideal for starting and transporting fire. Among the species used for this purpose there are Daedalea quercina, different kinds of Ganoderma, Coriolopsis gallica and Daldinia concentrica, all of them documented at la Draga. Tinder fungi was used to catch the sparks produced by hitting a siliceous rock against a mineral rich in ferric sulphide such as pyrite or marcasite. Researchers assure that the discovery makes La Draga an exceptional example for the study of fungi during Prehistory. It is one of the archaeological sites with a higher variety of fungi that has been retrieved till date.

Until now, the few archaeological discoveries of fungi belonged to sites in northern and central Europe, and only in a few cases was it possible to demonstrate technological uses. One of the most important was at the Mesolithic site of Starr Carr in England, in which samples were also interpreted as having been intentionally transported in order to be used as tinder fungi. Another notable example, but chronologically more recent than La Draga, are the remains transported by the iceman Ötzi as part of his equipment.

Importance of the Neolithic Site of la Draga

The remains studied form part a set of discoveries made at the Neolithic site of la Draga, located at the eastern shore of Lake Banyoles. The importance of this prehistoric settlement lies in the fact that it is one of the first enclaves where Neolithic farming societies decided to settle in the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula, about 7300 years ago, transforming the surroundings in order to carry out the agricultural and livestock practices necessary for their subsistence. The most outstanding feature at the site is the conservation of elements built with wood and other organic materials, an exceptional feat for such an early society and which contributes to a more complete comprehension of these first farming societies of the westernmost Mediterranean.

The site was discovered in 1990 and since then, different interventions have been carried out under the coordination of the Archaeological Museum of Banyoles and the participation of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, the Spanish National Research Council (IMF, Barcelona) and the Museum of Archaeology of Catalonia.
-end-
The excavations are funded by a project granted by the Department of Culture of the Government of Catalonia, while the research project has received the support of the Spanish Ministry for Economy and Competitiveness through a project coordinated by the CSIC, the UAB, and Recercaixa.

Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona

Related Fungi Articles:

Producing leather-like materials from fungi
Leather is used as a durable and flexible material in many aspects of everyday life including furniture and clothing.
Breaking down wood decomposition by fungi
Through a combination of lab and field experiments, researchers have developed a better understanding of the factors accounting for different wood decomposition rates among fungi.
Impulse for research on fungi
For the first time, the cells of fungi can also be analysed using a relatively simple microscopic method.
Fungi as food source for plants
The number of plant species that extract organic nutrients from fungi could be much higher than previously assumed.
Bark beetles control pathogenic fungi
Pathogens can drive the evolution of social behaviour in insects.
Using fungi to search for medical drugs
An enormous library of products derived from more than 10,000 fungi could help us find new drugs.
Plants and fungi together could slow climate change
A new global assessment shows that human impacts have greatly reduced plant-fungus symbioses, which play a key role in sequestering carbon in soils.
Make fungi think they're starving to stop them having sex, say scientists
Tricking fungi into thinking they're starving could be the key to slowing down our evolutionary arms race with fungal pathogens, as hungry fungi don't want to have sex.
How plants react to fungi
Using special receptors, plants recognize when they are at risk of fungal infection.
Clostridium difficile infections may have a friend in fungi
The pathogen Clostridium difficile, which causes one of the most common hospital-acquired infections in the United States, may have accomplices that until now have gone largely unnoticed.
More Fungi News and Fungi Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: The Power Of Spaces
How do spaces shape the human experience? In what ways do our rooms, homes, and buildings give us meaning and purpose? This hour, TED speakers explore the power of the spaces we make and inhabit. Guests include architect Michael Murphy, musician David Byrne, artist Es Devlin, and architect Siamak Hariri.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

What If?
There's plenty of speculation about what Donald Trump might do in the wake of the election. Would he dispute the results if he loses? Would he simply refuse to leave office, or even try to use the military to maintain control? Last summer, Rosa Brooks got together a team of experts and political operatives from both sides of the aisle to ask a slightly different question. Rather than arguing about whether he'd do those things, they dug into what exactly would happen if he did. Part war game part choose your own adventure, Rosa's Transition Integrity Project doesn't give us any predictions, and it isn't a referendum on Trump. Instead, it's a deeply illuminating stress test on our laws, our institutions, and on the commitment to democracy written into the constitution. This episode was reported by Bethel Habte, with help from Tracie Hunte, and produced by Bethel Habte. Jeremy Bloom provided original music. Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.     You can read The Transition Integrity Project's report here.