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Media registration now open for TCT 2009

April 27, 2009

WHAT:

Media may now register to attend TCT 2009 (Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics), the annual Scientific Symposium of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation. TCT gathers leading medical researchers and clinicians from around the world to present and discuss the latest developments in the field of interventional cardiology and vascular medicine. Now in its 21st year, TCT brings state-of-the-art techniques and training to interventional cardiologists around the world. To learn more about the conference, please visit: www.tctconference.com.

WHEN:

September 21-25, 2009

Late-breaking clinical trials and first report investigations will be highlighted during press conferences scheduled on Wednesday, September 23, Thursday, September 24, and Friday, September 25.

WHERE:

The Moscone Center
San Francisco, CA

WHY:

Cardiovascular disease kills more Americans every year than cancer, making it one of the country's most significant health risks and a critical health topic for millions of people.

TCT 2009 will be a significant source of breaking news on multiple topics related to cardiovascular health:
  • Several hundred oral and poster abstract presentations, detailing the latest research in interventional vascular medicine, will be presented along three central tracks: coronary, endovascular medicine and structural heart disease
  • Live procedures using the latest investigational technologies demonstrated by interventional cardiologists broadcast in HD in real time from more than 20 medical centers around the world
  • Innovative therapies and devices, "Hands on Heart" demonstrations and advances in heart imaging will also be featured
HOW TO REGISTER:

Media may apply for registration by clicking on: http://www.tctconference.com/press/press-registration/press-pre-registration.html

Details on required press credentials can be found at: http://www.tctconference.com/press/press-policies.html
-end-


Cardiovascular Research Foundation

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