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Elsevier launches Epidemics -- the journal on infectious disease dynamics

April 27, 2009

Amsterdam, 27 April 2009 - Elsevier, the world-leading publisher of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, is pleased to announce the launch of a new journal, entitled Epidemics - the journal on infectious disease dynamics (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/epidemics).

This peer-reviewed journal will publish papers on infectious disease dynamics in the broadest sense. Its scope covers both within-host dynamics of infectious agents, and dynamics at the population level, and particularly the interaction between the two. Authors are invited to submit their work to Epidemics through the online submission and review system (http://ees.elsevier.com/epidemics).

"The growth of research in infectious disease dynamics is reflected in the large number of quality papers that have been published in a wide range of discipline-specific and disease-specific journals, as well as the high impact generalist science publications", as stated in their editorial by the Editors, Sebastian Bonheoffer from Switzerland, Neil Ferguson from the UK, Hans Heesterbeek from the Netherlands, and Bette Korber from the USA. "There is a lack of a single publication dedicated to infectious disease dynamics research which brings together the disciplines contributing to the field. "With Epidemics we aim to address this need, and thereby play some part in helping this research field come of age".

"I am delighted and proud to see that so many of the leaders of the field have already contributed to the first issue of Epidemics", said Floris de Hon, Elsevier's Executive Publisher 'Immunology & Microbiology', "It is a highly valuable and very timely publication and I am convinced that it will become well-read across the world". He added: "Together with the related annual congress on Epidemics (http://www.epidemics.elsevier.com), launched last year, we aim to provide an integrated platform for research on infectious disease dynamics, an emerging field in the study of infectious diseases".
-end-
Notes to editors:

To receive a copy of Epidemics Volume 1, Issue 1, 2009, please contact the press office at newsroom@elsevier.com. The first issue of Epidemics is also available for free at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/17554365.

About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading publisher of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. Working in partnership with the global science and health communities, Elsevier's 7,000 employees in over 70 offices worldwide publish more than 2,000 journals and 1,900 new books per year, in addition to offering a suite of innovative electronic products, such as ScienceDirect (http://www.sciencedirect.com/), MD Consult (http://www.mdconsult.com/), Scopus (http://www.info.scopus.com/), bibliographic databases, and online reference works.

Elsevier (http://www.elsevier.com/) is a global business headquartered in Amsterdam, The Netherlands and has offices worldwide. Elsevier is part of Reed Elsevier Group plc (http://www.reedelsevier.com/), a world-leading publisher and information provider. Operating in the science and medical, legal, education and business-to-business sectors, Reed Elsevier provides high-quality and flexible information solutions to users, with increasing emphasis on the Internet as a means of delivery. Reed Elsevier's ticker symbols are REN (Euronext Amsterdam), REL (London Stock Exchange), RUK and ENL (New York Stock Exchange).

Elsevier

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