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Entomological Society of America's Linnaean Games teams selected

April 27, 2009

Each year, the Entomological Society of America (ESA) features the Linnaean Games at its Annual Meeting. The Games are a lively question-and-answer, college bowl-style competition on insect facts played between university-sponsored student teams. It is an important and entertaining component of the ESA Annual Meeting.

Two teams from each of ESA's five regional Branches will compete in the national competition this December at the ESA Annual Meeting in Indianapolis, Indiana. The teams, members, and coaches are listed below:

Eastern Branch
Winner: Virginia Tech University--Hamilton R. Allen, Meredith E. Cassell, Gina A. Davis, Amanda L. Koppel, and Laura M. Maxey; Douglas G. Pfeiffer (coach)
Runner-up: Penn State University--Robert D. Anderson, Scott M. Geib, Maya E. Nehme, Daniel R. Schmehl, and Ezra G. Schwartzberg; John F. Tooker (coach)

North Central Branch
Winner: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign--Robert F. Mitchell, Scott M. Shreve, Nils Cordes, Fredrick J. Larabee, and Stephanie E. Dold; Marianne Alleyne (coach)
Runner-up: University of Nebraska-Lincoln--Tim Husen, Erica J. Lindroth, Kentaro Miwa, Mitchell O. Stamm, and Abby R. Stilwell; Kenneth Pruess and Robert J. Wright (coaches)

Pacific Branch
Winner: University of California, Riverside--Andrew F. Ernst, Jennifer A. Henke, Elizabeth A. Murray, Adena M. Why, and Deane K. Zahn; Darcy A. Reed (coach)
Runner-up: Washington State University--Jeremy Buckman, Ashfaq A. Sial, Matthew D. Smart, and Nik G. Wiman; Richard S. Zack (coach)

Southeastern Branch
Winner: North Carolina State University--Keith M. Bayless, Ana R. Cabrera, Joseph P. Doskocil, Nick Kemps, Sandra Paa, and Virna L. Saenz; Hannah Joy Burrack (coach)
Runner-up: Louisiana State University--Grant R. Aucoin, Julien M. Beuzelin, Matthew L. Gimmel, Jennifer R. Gordon, and Katherine A. Parys; Jeremy Allison and Natalie A. Hummel (coaches)

Southwestern Branch
Winner: Texas A&M University--Apurba K. Barman, Shawn J. Hanrahan, Jonathan E. King, and Paul A. Lenhart; Marvin Harris (coach)
Runner-up: Oklahoma State University--Alissa M. Berro, Trisha R. Dubie, Lisa M. Overall, Anndrea N. Stacy, and Nalinda B. Wasala; Eric J. Rebek (coach)
-end-
For more information on the ESA Annual Meeting or the Linnaean Games, visit http://www.entsoc.org/am/cm/index.htm or contact Richard Levine at 301-731-4535.

Entomological Society of America

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