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Understanding a target of quinoline drugs

April 27, 2009

The full details about the molecules and mechanisms that underlie the development of autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus, remain to be discovered. One compound that may have a role in alleviating these conditions is quinoline-3-carboxamide, which is currently being tested in various clinical trials. In this week's PLoS Biology, researchers from Lund University, Sweden, the University of Munster in Germany, and the company Active Biotech AB, identify a molecular target for quinoline compounds.

This study shows that quinoline compounds bind to a molecule called S100A9, which is expressed in some white blood cells that are involved in the regulation of immune responses. Furthermore, S100A9 interacts with two known pro-inflammatory receptors (Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) and receptor of advanced glycation end products (RAGE), and this interaction is inhibited by quinoline compounds.

The published data describe a new mechanism whereby S100A9 can promote pro-inflammation at early stages of immune activation. These findings may lead to an increased understanding of the early steps in the development of autoimmune disease.

Three of Active Biotech's projects (laquinimod, 57-57 and TASQ) belong to the quinoline chemical class of compounds.
-end-
Funding - The Swedish Cancer Society, The Swedish Research Council, Kocks Foundation, Österlund Foundation and German Research Foundation funded this work. The funders had no role in study design, data collection, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing interests statement - Some of the other authors have full time employment status at Active Biotech and 1 author has a research grant from Active biotech (for another project).

Citation: Björk P, Björk A, Vogl T, Stenström M, Liberg D, et al. (2009) Identification of human S100A9 as a novel target for treatment of autoimmune disease via binding to quinoline-3-carboxamides. PLoS Biol 7(4): e1000097. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1000097

PLEASE ADD THE LINK TO THE PUBLISHED ARTICLE IN ONLINE VERSIONS OF YOUR REPORT: http://biology.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=get-document&doi=10.1371/journal.pbio.1000097

PRESS ONLY PREVIEW OF THE ARTICLE: http://www.plos.org/press/plbi-07-04-leanderson.pdf

CONTACT
Tomas Leanderson
Lund University
Immunology Group
BMC D14
Lund, S-221 84
Sweden
Tomas.Leanderson@med.lu.se

PLOS

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