Gastroenterology Special Issue confirms: You are what you eat

April 27, 2015

Bethesda, MD (April 27, 2015) -- Patients are always interested in understanding what they should eat and how it will impact their health. Physicians are just as interested in advancing their understanding of the major health effects of foods and food-related diseases. To satisfy this need, the editors of Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, are pleased to announce the publication of this year's highly anticipated special 13th issue on food, the immune system and the gastrointestinal tract.

"This special issue provides a tour de force of biological and clinical data regarding how food impacts health and disease," said Douglas A. Corley, MD, PhD, MPH, and Detlef Schuppan, MD, PhD, guest editors for this special issue. "We hope this will inform future research by identifying gaps in knowledge, while providing patients and clinicians with evidence-based summaries to guide clinical recommendations."

In the last two decades, we have witnessed a marked expansion of research into how food and nutritional elements influence health and disease. Food and its interactions with the immune system are a critical topic for gastroenterology to address, changing our view of digestion and resorption of food as the principal role of the gastrointestinal tract. Articles in this special issue of Gastroenterology evaluate immunology, biological mechanisms and clinical studies of foods and food-related diseases for all the major topic areas, including food allergies, celiac disease, non-celiac wheat sensitivity, carbohydrate (FODMAP) intolerance in relation to irritable bowel syndrome, cancer, obesity and brain-gut interactions.

The specific topics covered in this special 13th issue of Gastroenterology are outlined below. To speak with the study authors or receive access to the full reviews, please email media@gastro.org or call 301-272-1603.

Food and the Microbiome View the special issue of ">Gastroenterology

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About the AGA Institute

The American Gastroenterological Association is the trusted voice of the GI community. Founded in 1897, the AGA has grown to include more than 16,000 members from around the globe who are involved in all aspects of the science, practice and advancement of gastroenterology. The AGA Institute administers the practice, research and educational programs of the organization. http://www.gastro.org.

About Gastroenterology

Gastroenterology, the official journal of the AGA Institute, is the most prominent scientific journal in the specialty and is in the top 1 percent of indexed medical journals internationally. The journal publishes clinical and basic science studies of all aspects of the digestive system, including the liver and pancreas, as well as nutrition. The journal is abstracted and indexed in Biological Abstracts, Current Awareness in Biological Sciences, Chemical Abstracts, Current Contents, Excerpta Medica, Index Medicus, Nutrition Abstracts and Science Citation Index. For more information, visit http://www.gastrojournal.org.

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